Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Details in Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Room III - The Second Empire in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. In this room, dedicated to the Second Empire (1852-1870), are displayed paintings, sculptures, engravings, furniture, and other objects from the period of French history in which Napoleon III predominated. They exemplify the great ferment of artistic production which took place under the reassuring motto “The Empire is Peace”. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room III - The Second Empire in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. In this room, dedicated to the Second Empire (1852-1870), are displayed paintings, sculptures, engravings, furniture, and other objects from the period of French history in which Napoleon III predominated. They exemplify the great ferment of artistic production which took place under the reassuring motto “The Empire is Peace”. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
The Prince Imperial with his dog Nero in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. Napoleon, Prince Imperial, also known as Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte, was the only child of Emperor Napoleon III and his wife. The earthenware sculpture by Jean Baptiste Carpeaux dates from 1865. Room III in the Napoleonic Museum is dedicated to the Second Empire (1852-1870). The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Room III - The Second Empire in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. In this room, dedicated to the Second Empire (1852-1870), are displayed paintings, sculptures, engravings, furniture, and other objects from the period of French history in which Napoleon III predominated. They exemplify the great ferment of artistic production which took place under the reassuring motto “The Empire is Peace”. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room III - The Second Empire in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. In this room, dedicated to the Second Empire (1852-1870), are displayed paintings, sculptures, engravings, furniture, and other objects from the period of French history in which Napoleon III predominated. They exemplify the great ferment of artistic production which took place under the reassuring motto “The Empire is Peace”. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room IV - The King of Rome in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This small room, dedicated to the son of Napoleon and Maria Luisa of Austria houses the collection of relics and autographs connected to Anton Prokesch-Osten, tutor and friend of the young Bonaparte. The room and the objects in it, retain an intimate character, which reflects the short and somewhat hidden existence of Napoleon’s son. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room IV - The King of Rome in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This small room, dedicated to the son of Napoleon and Maria Luisa of Austria houses the collection of relics and autographs connected to Anton Prokesch-Osten, tutor and friend of the young Bonaparte. The room and the objects in it, retain an intimate character, which reflects the short and somewhat hidden existence of Napoleon’s son. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room IV - The King of Rome in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This small room, dedicated to the son of Napoleon and Maria Luisa of Austria houses the collection of relics and autographs connected to Anton Prokesch-Osten, tutor and friend of the young Bonaparte. The room and the objects in it, retain an intimate character, which reflects the short and somewhat hidden existence of Napoleon’s son. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room IV - The King of Rome in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This small room, dedicated to the son of Napoleon and Maria Luisa of Austria houses the collection of relics and autographs connected to Anton Prokesch-Osten, tutor and friend of the young Bonaparte. The room and the objects in it, retain an intimate character, which reflects the short and somewhat hidden existence of Napoleon’s son. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room IV - The King of Rome in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This small room, dedicated to the son of Napoleon and Maria Luisa of Austria houses the collection of relics and autographs connected to Anton Prokesch-Osten, tutor and friend of the young Bonaparte. The room and the objects in it, retain an intimate character, which reflects the short and somewhat hidden existence of Napoleon’s son. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room IV - The King of Rome in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This small room, dedicated to the son of Napoleon and Maria Luisa of Austria houses the collection of relics and autographs connected to Anton Prokesch-Osten, tutor and friend of the young Bonaparte. The room and the objects in it, retain an intimate character, which reflects the short and somewhat hidden existence of Napoleon’s son. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room V - The Roman Republic in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the Republic of Rome declared on the 15th February 1798 and contains prints of this brief Jacobine experience. In 1798, upon his refusal to renounce to his temporal power, Pius VI was taken prisoner and transported to France. He died one year later in Valence. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Room VI - Pauline Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room, dedicated to Pauline Bonaparte Borghese, concentrates particularly on her stay in Rome from 1816 to 1825. The dormouse in mahogany, is similar to the sofa on which Pauline posed for the famous Canova statue, which showed her dressed as Venus Vincitrice (Rome, Borghese Gallery). The plaster cast of the princess’ breast and the model of her head come from Canova’s masterpiece.The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room VI - Pauline Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room, dedicated to Pauline Bonaparte Borghese, concentrates particularly on her stay in Rome from 1816 to 1825. The dormouse in mahogany, is similar to the sofa on which Pauline posed for the famous Canova statue, which showed her dressed as Venus Vincitrice (Rome, Borghese Gallery). The plaster cast of the princess’ breast and the model of her head come from Canova’s masterpiece.The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room VI - Pauline Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room, dedicated to Pauline Bonaparte Borghese, concentrates particularly on her stay in Rome from 1816 to 1825. The dormouse in mahogany, is similar to the sofa on which Pauline posed for the famous Canova statue, which showed her dressed as Venus Vincitrice (Rome, Borghese Gallery). The plaster cast of the princess’ breast and the model of her head come from Canova’s masterpiece.The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room VI - Pauline Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room, dedicated to Pauline Bonaparte Borghese, concentrates particularly on her stay in Rome from 1816 to 1825. The dormouse in mahogany, is similar to the sofa on which Pauline posed for the famous Canova statue, which showed her dressed as Venus Vincitrice (Rome, Borghese Gallery). The plaster cast of the princess’ breast and the model of her head come from Canova’s masterpiece.The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room VII - The Kingdom of Naples in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. In these rooms are displayed objects related to Joseph and Caroline Bonaparte, Napoleon’s brother and sister, who held to the throne of the Kingdom of Naples one after the other. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room VIII - Myth and Satire in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room contains various important testimonies of the vitality of the Napoleonic myth in the years of the mid-XIXth century, including images in the popular press. In the years after his fall and death, Napoleon became an important figure in the French and European collective imaginations. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room VIII - Myth and Satire in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room contains various important testimonies of the vitality of the Napoleonic myth in the years of the mid-XIXth century, including images in the popular press. In the years after his fall and death, Napoleon became an important figure in the French and European collective imaginations. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room VIII - Myth and Satire in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room contains various important testimonies of the vitality of the Napoleonic myth in the years of the mid-XIXth century, including images in the popular press. In the years after his fall and death, Napoleon became an important figure in the French and European collective imaginations. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
The clothes of the Emperor in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the fashion style in the First Empire. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
The clothes of the Emperor in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the fashion style in the First Empire. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
The clothes of the Emperor in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the fashion style in the First Empire. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
The clothes of the Emperor in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the fashion style in the First Empire. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Room VII - The Kingdom of Naples in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. In these rooms are displayed objects related to Joseph and Caroline Bonaparte, Napoleon’s brother and sister, who held to the throne of the Kingdom of Naples one after the other. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room VI - Pauline Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room, dedicated to Pauline Bonaparte Borghese, concentrates particularly on her stay in Rome from 1816 to 1825. The dormouse in mahogany, is similar to the sofa on which Pauline posed for the famous Canova statue, which showed her dressed as Venus Vincitrice (Rome, Borghese Gallery). The plaster cast of the princess’ breast and the model of her head come from Canova’s masterpiece.The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room IV - The King of Rome in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This small room, dedicated to the son of Napoleon and Maria Luisa of Austria houses the collection of relics and autographs connected to Anton Prokesch-Osten, tutor and friend of the young Bonaparte. The room and the objects in it, retain an intimate character, which reflects the short and somewhat hidden existence of Napoleon’s son. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room IV - The King of Rome in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This small room, dedicated to the son of Napoleon and Maria Luisa of Austria houses the collection of relics and autographs connected to Anton Prokesch-Osten, tutor and friend of the young Bonaparte. The room and the objects in it, retain an intimate character, which reflects the short and somewhat hidden existence of Napoleon’s son. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
The Prince Imperial in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. Napoleon, Prince Imperial, also known as Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte, was the only child of Emperor Napoleon III and his wife. The bust by Jean Baptiste Carpeaux dates from 1865. Room III in the Napoleonic Museum is dedicated to the Second Empire (1852-1870). The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Room IX - Zenaide and Carlotta in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to Zenaide and Carlotta, daughters of Joseph Bonaparte. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Room III - The Second Empire in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. In this room, dedicated to the Second Empire (1852-1870), are displayed paintings, sculptures, engravings, furniture, and other objects from the period of French history in which Napoleon III predominated. They exemplify the great ferment of artistic production which took place under the reassuring motto “The Empire is Peace”. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson.
Room IX - Zenaide and Carlotta in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to Zenaide and Carlotta, daughters of Joseph Bonaparte. The Napoleonic Museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Sala X - Luciano Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to Luciano Bonaparte, Napoleon’s brother, that had taken on important political role. The relationship between the two brothers,was compromised for political reasons and personal reasons. The Room collects testimonies of his life in Rome where he settled down with his numerous family since 1804. In 1829 he published his Catalogue of chosen Etruscan antiquities found in the excavations of Prince Canino near Viterbo.
Sala X - Luciano Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to Luciano Bonaparte, Napoleon’s brother, that had taken on important political role. The relationship between the two brothers,was compromised for political reasons and personal reasons. The Room collects testimonies of his life in Rome where he settled down with his numerous family since 1804. In 1829 he published his Catalogue of chosen Etruscan antiquities found in the excavations of Prince Canino near Viterbo.
Sala XI - Carlo Luciano e Zenaide Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the descendants of the two cousins and their marriages to various members of the Roman aristocracy (del Gallo di Roccagiovine, Primoli, Campello, Gabrielli). Iy can be called the Roman branch of the Bonaparte family. One of them Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson, donated the Napoleonic Museum to the city of Rome. The room is dominated by the huge portrait of Carlotta Bonaparte, the elder daughter of Luciano, created by Jean-Baptiste Wicar.
Sala X - Luciano Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to Luciano Bonaparte, Napoleon’s brother, that had taken on important political role. The relationship between the two brothers,was compromised for political reasons and personal reasons. The Room collects testimonies of his life in Rome where he settled down with his numerous family since 1804. In 1829 he published his Catalogue of chosen Etruscan antiquities found in the excavations of Prince Canino near Viterbo.
Sala XI - Carlo Luciano e Zenaide Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the descendants of the two cousins and their marriages to various members of the Roman aristocracy (del Gallo di Roccagiovine, Primoli, Campello, Gabrielli). Iy can be called the Roman branch of the Bonaparte family. One of them Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson, donated the Napoleonic Museum to the city of Rome. The room is dominated by the huge portrait of Carlotta Bonaparte, the elder daughter of Luciano, created by Jean-Baptiste Wicar.
Room XII - Giuseppe Primoli and Matilde Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room is dedicated to the “landlord”, Giuseppe Primoli, the founder of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome and grandson of Napoleon and his aunt Matilde Bonaparte Demidoff. Matilde was known as “Notre Dame des Arts”, since she had opened her salotto-atelier to the best writers and artists of the time: amongst others, Flaubert, Dumas, the Goncourt brothers, Maupassant, and Ernest Hébert.
Room XII - Giuseppe Primoli and Matilde Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room is dedicated to the “landlord”, Giuseppe Primoli, the founder of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome and grandson of Napoleon and his aunt Matilde Bonaparte Demidoff. Matilde was known as “Notre Dame des Arts”, since she had opened her salotto-atelier to the best writers and artists of the time: amongst others, Flaubert, Dumas, the Goncourt brothers, Maupassant, and Ernest Hébert.
Room XII - Giuseppe Primoli and Matilde Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room is dedicated to the “landlord”, Giuseppe Primoli, the founder of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome and grandson of Napoleon and his aunt Matilde Bonaparte Demidoff. Matilde was known as “Notre Dame des Arts”, since she had opened her salotto-atelier to the best writers and artists of the time: amongst others, Flaubert, Dumas, the Goncourt brothers, Maupassant, and Ernest Hébert.
Room XII - Giuseppe Primoli and Matilde Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room is dedicated to the “landlord”, Giuseppe Primoli, the founder of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome and grandson of Napoleon and his aunt Matilde Bonaparte Demidoff. Matilde was known as “Notre Dame des Arts”, since she had opened her salotto-atelier to the best writers and artists of the time: amongst others, Flaubert, Dumas, the Goncourt brothers, Maupassant, and Ernest Hébert.
Room XII - Giuseppe Primoli in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The “landlord”, Giuseppe Primoli, the founder of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome and grandson of Napoleon. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Room XII - Giuseppe Primoli and Matilde Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room is dedicated to the “landlord”, Giuseppe Primoli, the founder of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome and grandson of Napoleon and his aunt Matilde Bonaparte Demidoff. Matilde was known as “Notre Dame des Arts”, since she had opened her salotto-atelier to the best writers and artists of the time: amongst others, Flaubert, Dumas, the Goncourt brothers, Maupassant, and Ernest Hébert.
Room XII - Giuseppe Primoli and Matilde Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room is dedicated to the “landlord”, Giuseppe Primoli, the founder of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome and grandson of Napoleon and his aunt Matilde Bonaparte Demidoff. Matilde was known as “Notre Dame des Arts”, since she had opened her salotto-atelier to the best writers and artists of the time: amongst others, Flaubert, Dumas, the Goncourt brothers, Maupassant, and Ernest Hébert.
Room XII - Giuseppe Primoli and Matilde Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room is dedicated to the “landlord”, Giuseppe Primoli, the founder of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome and grandson of Napoleon and his aunt Matilde Bonaparte Demidoff. Matilde was known as “Notre Dame des Arts”, since she had opened her salotto-atelier to the best writers and artists of the time: amongst others, Flaubert, Dumas, the Goncourt brothers, Maupassant, and Ernest Hébert.
Sala XI - Carlo Luciano e Zenaide Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the descendants of the two cousins and their marriages to various members of the Roman aristocracy (del Gallo di Roccagiovine, Primoli, Campello, Gabrielli). Iy can be called the Roman branch of the Bonaparte family. One of them Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson, donated the Napoleonic Museum to the city of Rome. The room is dominated by the huge portrait of Carlotta Bonaparte, the elder daughter of Luciano, created by Jean-Baptiste Wicar
Sala XI - Carlo Luciano e Zenaide Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the descendants of the two cousins and their marriages to various members of the Roman aristocracy (del Gallo di Roccagiovine, Primoli, Campello, Gabrielli). Iy can be called the Roman branch of the Bonaparte family. One of them Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson, donated the Napoleonic Museum to the city of Rome. The room is dominated by the huge portrait of Carlotta Bonaparte, the elder daughter of Luciano, created by Jean-Baptiste Wicar
Sala XI - Carlo Luciano e Zenaide Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the descendants of the two cousins and their marriages to various members of the Roman aristocracy (del Gallo di Roccagiovine, Primoli, Campello, Gabrielli). Iy can be called the Roman branch of the Bonaparte family. One of them Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson, donated the Napoleonic Museum to the city of Rome. The room is dominated by the huge portrait of Carlotta Bonaparte, the elder daughter of Luciano, created by Jean-Baptiste Wicar
Sala XI - Carlo Luciano e Zenaide Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the descendants of the two cousins and their marriages to various members of the Roman aristocracy (del Gallo di Roccagiovine, Primoli, Campello, Gabrielli). Iy can be called the Roman branch of the Bonaparte family. One of them Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson, donated the Napoleonic Museum to the city of Rome. The room is dominated by the huge portrait of Carlotta Bonaparte, the elder daughter of Luciano, created by Jean-Baptiste Wicar
Sala XI - Carlo Luciano e Zenaide Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the descendants of the two cousins and their marriages to various members of the Roman aristocracy (del Gallo di Roccagiovine, Primoli, Campello, Gabrielli). Iy can be called the Roman branch of the Bonaparte family. One of them Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson, donated the Napoleonic Museum to the city of Rome. The room is dominated by the huge portrait of Carlotta Bonaparte, the elder daughter of Luciano, created by Jean-Baptiste Wicar
Sala XI - Carlo Luciano e Zenaide Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The room is dedicated to the descendants of the two cousins and their marriages to various members of the Roman aristocracy (del Gallo di Roccagiovine, Primoli, Campello, Gabrielli). Iy can be called the Roman branch of the Bonaparte family. One of them Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson, donated the Napoleonic Museum to the city of Rome. The room is dominated by the huge portrait of Carlotta Bonaparte, the elder daughter of Luciano, created by Jean-Baptiste Wicar
Room XII - Giuseppe Primoli and Matilde Bonaparte in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. This room is dedicated to the “landlord”, Giuseppe Primoli, the founder of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome and grandson of Napoleon and his aunt Matilde Bonaparte Demidoff. Matilde was known as “Notre Dame des Arts”, since she had opened her salotto-atelier to the best writers and artists of the time: amongst others, Flaubert, Dumas, the Goncourt brothers, Maupassant, and Ernest Hébert.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance Hall in the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The first two rooms are dedicated o the splendor of the First Empire (1804-1814). Here are collected the large canvases which depict numerous members of the imperial families in noble and conventional poses. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Entrance of the Napoleonic Museum in Rome Italy. The museum hosts Napoleonic paintings and heirlooms donated to the city of Rome by Count Giuseppe Primoli, the Emperor’s grandson. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Palazzo Zanardelli which hosts the Napoleonic Museum in Rome, Italy. Located in the city center near Piazza Navona and St. Peter it was donated by Giuseppe Primoli, the grandson of Napoleon Bonaparte to the Municipality of Rome in 1927. The Napoleonic Museum hosts paintings and heirlooms of the Bonaparte family. The Count’s wish was not so much to display the imperial grandeur of the Bonaparte family as to recount their private history and celebrate the close relationship between the Bonapartes and the city of Rome.
Back to Top