Entrance of the Palazzo Venezia, formerly Palace of St. Mark appointed to the church of San Marco in Rome, Italy, The palace is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. In 1564, Pope Pius IV gave the mansion to the Venetian embassy to Rome. The palace currently houses the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia. Benito Mussolini had his office in the Palazzo Venezia in the Sala del Mappamondo, and used its balcony overlooking the Piazza Venezia
Entrance of the Palazzo Venezia, formerly Palace of St. Mark appointed to the church of San Marco in Rome, Italy, The palace is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. In 1564, Pope Pius IV gave the mansion to the Venetian embassy to Rome. The palace currently houses the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia. Benito Mussolini had his office in the Palazzo Venezia in the Sala del Mappamondo, and used its balcony overlooking the Piazza Venezia
Madama Lucrezia sited on a plinth in the corner of a piazza between the Palazzo Venezia and the basilica of St. Mark in Rome, Italy. Madama Lucrezia is a colossal Roman bust, about 3 meters high.The statue is badly disfigured, and the original subject cannot be identified with certainty, but may represent the Egyptian goddess Isis. She is is one of the five "talking statues" of Rome and the only female sculpture.
The Great Courtyard of Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Palazzo Venezia currently houses the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia. Pope Paul II commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The Benediction Loggia of Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Pope Paul II commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The palace's old portico was transformed into a benediction loggia. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome. Palazzo Venezia currently houses the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia.
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
The Benediction Loggia of Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Pope Paul II commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The palace's old portico was transformed into a benediction loggia. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome. Palazzo Venezia currently houses the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia.
The Benediction Loggia of Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Pope Paul II commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The palace's old portico was transformed into a benediction loggia. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome. Palazzo Venezia currently houses the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia.
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Particular of the ceiling of the room of the Labours of Hercules. In the Palazzo Venezia today National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The room bellows to the apartments of the Cardinal. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Bvlgari, the story, the dream exhibition in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Luxury jeweler Bulgari displays sumptuous jewelry and vintage couture from the so-called Dolce Vita era until 3 November 2019
Sala Reggia in the apartments of the Cardinal of Palazzo Venezia today National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Entrance of the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia it contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.
Monumental stair of Palazzo Venezia today the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia it contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.
Monumental stair of Palazzo Venezia today the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia it contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.
Artworks from the middle age in the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Artworks from the middle age in the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Artworks from the middle age in the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Artworks from the middle age in the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Artworks from the middle age in the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Artworks from the middle age in the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Christian Paintings and wood sculptures from the 14th to the 15th century in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Christian Paintings and wood sculptures from the 14th to the 15th century in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Christian Paintings and wood sculptures from the 14th to the 15th century in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Christian Paintings and wood sculptures from the 14th to the 15th century in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Christian Paintings and wood sculptures from the 14th to the 15th century in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Christian Paintings and wood sculptures from the 14th to the 15th century in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Jesus and the adulteress in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The painting by Nicolò De Barbari dates from the beginning of the 16th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the National Museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Christian Paintings and wood sculptures from the 14th to the 15th century in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Christian Paintings and wood sculptures from the 14th to the 15th century in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
Christian Paintings and wood sculptures from the 14th to the 15th century in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The silver collection in the Querini Hall of the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The pieces origins mostly from Germany and dates from the 16th and 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia it contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The porcelain collection in the Hallway of the Cardinal in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The silver collection in the Querini Hall of the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The pieces origins mostly from Germany and dates from the 16th and 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia it contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The silver collection in the Querini Hall of the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The pieces origins mostly from Germany and dates from the 16th and 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia it contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The silver collection in the Querini Hall of the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The pieces origins mostly from Germany and dates from the 16th and 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia it contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The bronze collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. It includes the collections of Alfredo Barsanti and Giacinto Auriti. The mostly Italian artworks origins from the 15th to the 17th century. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance.Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The marble collection the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. In 2005 the collection was located in the upper part of the loggia over the garden of the 15th century. The so called lapidarium houses artworks that origins among others from the Mattei collection and the Museum of Industrial Artworks and dates from the antiquity to modern times. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
The earthenware collection in the National Museum of the Palazzo Venezia Rome, Italy. The artworks dates from the 17th to the 20th century and origins from the Evan Gorgo collection. Housed in the building of Palazzo Venezia the museum contains galleries of art, predominantly pottery, tapestry, statuary from the early Christian era up to early Renaissance. Palazzo Venezia is located just north of the Capitoline Hill. In 1469 owned by Cardinal Pietro Barbo, nephew of Pope Eugenius IV and the future Pope Paul II it became a residential papal palace, having undergone a massive extension. The pope commissioned perhaps Alberti or Giuliano da Maiano to enlarge his palace in 1455, by incorporating into it the adjacent 9th-century basilica of San Marco. The building manifests some of the first Renaissance architectural features in Rome.
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