Neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Designed by the neoclassical architect Giuseppe Valadier in 1806 for the banker for the banker Giovanni Torlonia and his son Alessandro it is today a museum and public park. The dictator Mussolini rented it from the Torlonia for one lira a year to use as his state residence from the 1920s onwards.
Neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Designed by the neoclassical architect Giuseppe Valadier in 1806 for the banker for the banker Giovanni Torlonia and his son Alessandro it is today a museum and public park. The dictator Mussolini rented it from the Torlonia for one lira a year to use as his state residence from the 1920s onwards.
Neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Designed by the neoclassical architect Giuseppe Valadier in 1806 for the banker for the banker Giovanni Torlonia and his son Alessandro it is today a museum and public park. The dictator Mussolini rented it from the Torlonia for one lira a year to use as his state residence from the 1920s onwards.
Neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Designed by the neoclassical architect Giuseppe Valadier in 1806 for the banker for the banker Giovanni Torlonia and his son Alessandro it is today a museum and public park. The dictator Mussolini rented it from the Torlonia for one lira a year to use as his state residence from the 1920s onwards.
Bath of the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Half-fresco of Raphael’s Galatea, painted by Paoletti.
Dancer resting her chin on a finger in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The prototype of this statue, in which the figure is missing her head, arms and feet, can indubitably be considered the Dancer resting her chin on a finger or Manzoni dancer (after Domenico Manzoni, who commissioned it from Antonio Canova in 1811).
Stucco reliefs by Antonio Canova in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Today in the Berceau Room the three stucco reliefs by Antonio Canova (originally there were ten) were inserted in the walls of the Dining Room in the Palace of Villa Torlonia.
Stucco reliefs by Antonio Canova in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Today in the Berceau Room the three stucco reliefs by Antonio Canova (originally there were ten) were inserted in the walls of the Dining Room in the Palace of Villa Torlonia.
Stucco reliefs by Antonio Canova in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Today in the Berceau Room the three stucco reliefs by Antonio Canova (originally there were ten) were inserted in the walls of the Dining Room in the Palace of Villa Torlonia.
Stucco reliefs by Antonio Canova in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Today in the Berceau Room the three stucco reliefs by Antonio Canova (originally there were ten) were inserted in the walls of the Dining Room in the Palace of Villa Torlonia.
Portico in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Originally projected by the neoclassical architect Giuseppe Valadier in 1806
Athena Parthènos in the portico of the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The sculpture is a replica of the statue of Athena Parthènos and was probably made between the late Trajan era and the mid-second century AD. It was bought by Giovanni Torlonia senior in 1800 but it's unknown when it became a feature of the Villa’s decorations.
Portico in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Originally projected by the neoclassical architect Giuseppe Valadier in 1806
Diana the Huntress in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The work may be connected to the school of the Danish master Thorvaldsen half of 18th century.
Ballroom in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Central feature of the Casino, the Ballroom, follows the original project of Valadier. The two orchestra structures stand on superb grooved columns made of Carrara marble. The vault is decorated with stories of Eros.
The Italian Artists and Poets Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Named after the 32 portraits painted by Pietro Paoletti within a Gothic-style painted architectural structure that was once enhanced with views and colored window glass.
Gabine Diana in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Located in the Italian artists and poets room the work is a cast-iron copy of a Roman statue (today in the Louvre) found in the excavations at Gabii in 1792.
Gabine Diana in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Located in the Italian artists and poets room the work is a cast-iron copy of a Roman statue (today in the Louvre) found in the excavations at Gabii in 1792.
Ballroom in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Central feature of the Casino, the Ballroom, follows the original project of Valadier. The two orchestra structures stand on superb grooved columns made of Carrara marble. The vault is decorated with stories of Eros.
Ballroom in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Central feature of the Casino, the Ballroom, follows the original project of Valadier. The two orchestra structures stand on superb grooved columns made of Carrara marble. The vault is decorated with stories of Eros.
Togaed Figure in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The sculpture origins from end of Augustan era - first half of Tiberian era (first half of 1rst century) and was restored by Cavaceppi (end of 18th century)
Ballroom in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Central feature of the Casino, the Ballroom, follows the original project of Valadier. The two orchestra structures stand on superb grooved columns made of Carrara marble. The vault is decorated with stories of Eros.
Ballroom in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Central feature of the Casino, the Ballroom, follows the original project of Valadier. The two orchestra structures stand on superb grooved columns made of Carrara marble. The vault is decorated with stories of Eros.
Diana the Huntress in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The work may be connected to the school of the Danish master Thorvaldsen half of 18th century.
Ballroom in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Central feature of the Casino, the Ballroom, follows the original project of Valadier. The two orchestra structures stand on superb grooved columns made of Carrara marble. The vault is decorated with stories of Eros.
Diana the Huntress in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The work may be connected to the school of the Danish master Thorvaldsen half of 18th century.
View of the Ballroom in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Central feature of the Casino, the Ballroom, follows the original project of Valadier. The two orchestra structures stand on superb grooved columns made of Carrara marble. The vault is decorated with stories of Eros.
Carrara marble head of a woman in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The head was found recently in the rooms beneath the Theatre in the Villa, the origin is unknown.
Second vestibule in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Sculpture representing Pandora. The Torlonia Pandora is a reproduction of the Capitoline Pandora that perhaps originally represented a priest holding a vase. It was found headless in Hadrian’s Villa in Tivoli and became the property of Cardinal Ippolito d’Este.
Second vestibule in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Sculpture representing Pandora. The Torlonia Pandora is a reproduction of the Capitoline Pandora that perhaps originally represented a priest holding a vase. It was found headless in Hadrian’s Villa in Tivoli and became the property of Cardinal Ippolito d’Este.
Second vestibule in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Sculptures representing Antisthenes, Hadrian, Modesty and Pandora.
View of the Ballroom in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Central feature of the Casino, the Ballroom, follows the original project of Valadier. The two orchestra structures stand on superb grooved columns made of Carrara marble. The vault is decorated with stories of Eros.
Staircase in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The private apartments are reached by an ingenious staircase, created by Carinetti in a small space, with marble steps and finely worked bronze balustrade by Filippo Ghirlanda
Staircase in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The private apartments are reached by an ingenious staircase, created by Carinetti in a small space, with marble steps and finely worked bronze balustrade by Filippo Ghirlanda
Staircase in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The private apartments are reached by an ingenious staircase, created by Carinetti in a small space, with marble steps and finely worked bronze balustrade by Filippo Ghirlanda
Antechamber of the piano nobile in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The staircase leads to an antechamber that opens onto the large loggia on the pronaos. It has ceilings decorated by Decio Trabalza of Dawn, Day and Night.
Staircase in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The private apartments are reached by an ingenious staircase, created by Carinetti in a small space, with marble steps and finely worked bronze balustrade by Filippo Ghirlanda
Antechamber of the piano nobile in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The staircase leads to an antechamber that opens onto the large loggia on the pronaos. It has ceilings decorated by Decio Trabalza of Dawn, Day and Night.
Antechamber of the piano nobile in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The staircase leads to an antechamber decorated with marble busts of men.
Alexander’s hall in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The hall was the dining room of the private apartments located on the second floor of the palace, decorated with images images of Alexander's triumphs and sculptors of Apollo and the Muses.
Alexander’s hall in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The hall was the dining room of the private apartments located on the second floor of the palace, decorated with images images of Alexander's triumphs and sculptors of Apollo and the Muses.
Alexander’s hall in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The hall was the dining room of the private apartments located on the second floor of the palace, decorated with images images of Alexander's triumphs and sculptors of Apollo and the Muses.
Alexander’s hall in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The hall was the dining room of the private apartments located on the second floor of the palace, decorated with images images of Alexander's triumphs and sculptors of Apollo and the Muses.
Antechamber of the piano nobile in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The staircase leads to an antechamber decorated with marble busts of men.
Alexander’s hall in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The hall was the dining room of the private apartments located on the second floor of the palace, decorated with images images of Alexander's triumphs and sculptors of Apollo and the Muses.
Staircase in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The private apartments are reached by an ingenious staircase, created by Carinetti in a small space, with marble steps and finely worked bronze balustrade by Filippo Ghirlanda
Antechamber of the piano nobile in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The staircase leads to an antechamber decorated with marble busts of men.
Antechamber of the piano nobile in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The staircase leads to an antechamber decorated with marble busts of men.
The Bacchus room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The room is entirely frescoed with Stories of the myth of Bacchusi, the Seasons, and the three Continents by Francesco Podesti. The polychrome mosaic floor illustrates Hercules as a boy throttling the serpents.
The Bacchus room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The room is entirely frescoed with Stories of the myth of Bacchusi, the Seasons, and the three Continents by Francesco Podesti. The polychrome mosaic floor illustrates Hercules as a boy throttling the serpents.
The Bacchus room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The room is entirely frescoed with Stories of the myth of Bacchusi, the Seasons, and the three Continents by Francesco Podesti. The polychrome mosaic floor illustrates Hercules as a boy throttling the serpents.
The Gothic Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The room was entirely decorated by Giovan Battista Caretti as a Gothic loggia with false windows.The marble floor with elements in the same Gothic style.
The Bacchus room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The room is entirely frescoed with Stories of the myth of Bacchusi, the Seasons, and the three Continents by Francesco Podesti. The polychrome mosaic floor illustrates Hercules as a boy throttling the serpents.
The Gothic Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The room was entirely decorated by Giovan Battista Caretti as a Gothic loggia with false windows.The marble floor with elements in the same Gothic style.
The Gothic Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The room was entirely decorated by Giovan Battista Caretti as a Gothic loggia with false windows.The marble floor with elements in the same Gothic style.
The Gothic Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The room was entirely decorated by Giovan Battista Caretti as a Gothic loggia with false windows.The marble floor with elements in the same Gothic style.
The Egyptian Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Next to Alessandro’s Room the space is lined entirely with decorations inspired by ancient Egypt and stories of Anthony and Cleopatra. The panels are inserted in a complex decorative program of hieroglyphs, columns and false architectural elements made to imitate basalt.
The Egyptian Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Next to Alessandro’s Room the space is lined entirely with decorations inspired by ancient Egypt and stories of Anthony and Cleopatra. The panels are inserted in a complex decorative program of hieroglyphs, columns and false architectural elements made to imitate basalt.
The Egyptian Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Next to Alessandro’s Room the space is lined entirely with decorations inspired by ancient Egypt and stories of Anthony and Cleopatra. The panels are inserted in a complex decorative program of hieroglyphs, columns and false architectural elements made to imitate basalt.
The Egyptian Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Next to Alessandro’s Room the space is lined entirely with decorations inspired by ancient Egypt and stories of Anthony and Cleopatra. The panels are inserted in a complex decorative program of hieroglyphs, columns and false architectural elements made to imitate basalt.
The Egyptian Room in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. Next to Alessandro’s Room the space is lined entirely with decorations inspired by ancient Egypt and stories of Anthony and Cleopatra. The panels are inserted in a complex decorative program of hieroglyphs, columns and false architectural elements made to imitate basalt.
The bedrooms in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The bedrooms end the two sides. They are painted with drapery imitating the curtains of a canopied bed and, at the centre of the vault, panels of Venus at her toilet and Psyche carried by the winds by Pietro Paoletti.
Staircase in the neoclassical palace today Museum of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. The private apartments are reached by an ingenious staircase, created by Carinetti in a small space, with marble steps and finely worked bronze balustrade by Filippo Ghirlanda.
view of a Sacred small temple in the park of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. At the end of the 1970s, the Municipality of Rome purchased Villa Torlonia and started restoring the architectural emergencies inside the park. The Park of Villa Torlonia lies on the north boundary covers 13.2 hectares and has a rich and complex past, socially and historically, particularly regarding the development of its landscaped grounds.
The so called Serra Moresca, example of Roman Liberty style in the park of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. It was designated as the Museum of Liberty Glass once the building itself had been fully restored to its former glory. At the end of the 1970s, the Municipality of Rome purchased Villa Torlonia and started restoring the architectural emergencies inside the park including the complex of the Serra and Torre Moresca (Moorish greenhouse and tower), a 19th century masterpiece by architect Giuseppe Jappelli. Lastly, the entire structure was reassembled. A glass artist then applied magnificent colored glass on all of the greenhouse’s windows.
The so called Serra Moresca, example of Roman Liberty style in the park of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. It was designated as the Museum of Liberty Glass once the building itself had been fully restored to its former glory. At the end of the 1970s, the Municipality of Rome purchased Villa Torlonia and started restoring the architectural emergencies inside the park including the complex of the Serra and Torre Moresca (Moorish greenhouse and tower), a 19th century masterpiece by architect Giuseppe Jappelli. Lastly, the entire structure was reassembled. A glass artist then applied magnificent colored glass on all of the greenhouse’s windows.
The so called Serra Moresca, example of Roman Liberty style in the park of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. It was designated as the Museum of Liberty Glass once the building itself had been fully restored to its former glory. At the end of the 1970s, the Municipality of Rome purchased Villa Torlonia and started restoring the architectural emergencies inside the park including the complex of the Serra and Torre Moresca (Moorish greenhouse and tower), a 19th century masterpiece by architect Giuseppe Jappelli. Lastly, the entire structure was reassembled. A glass artist then applied magnificent colored glass on all of the greenhouse’s windows.
view of a park of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. At the end of the 1970s, the Municipality of Rome purchased Villa Torlonia and started restoring the architectural emergencies inside the park. The Park of Villa Torlonia lies on the north boundary covers 13.2 hectares and has a rich and complex past, socially and historically, particularly regarding the development of its landscaped grounds. The landscaped grounds are in the English style.
view of a park of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. At the end of the 1970s, the Municipality of Rome purchased Villa Torlonia and started restoring the architectural emergencies inside the park. The Park of Villa Torlonia lies on the north boundary covers 13.2 hectares and has a rich and complex past, socially and historically, particularly regarding the development of its landscaped grounds. The landscaped grounds are in the English style.
view of a park of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. At the end of the 1970s, the Municipality of Rome purchased Villa Torlonia and started restoring the architectural emergencies inside the park. The Park of Villa Torlonia lies on the north boundary covers 13.2 hectares and has a rich and complex past, socially and historically, particularly regarding the development of its landscaped grounds. The landscaped grounds are in the English style.
view of a park of Villa Torlonia, Rome, Italy. At the end of the 1970s, the Municipality of Rome purchased Villa Torlonia and started restoring the architectural emergencies inside the park. The Park of Villa Torlonia lies on the north boundary covers 13.2 hectares and has a rich and complex past, socially and historically, particularly regarding the development of its landscaped grounds. The landscaped grounds are in the English style.
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