Material documenting the occupation of Rome in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site, museum details the underground struggle, exhibiting manifestos and handbills of the resistance. It provides information about those imprisoned in Via Tasso and pays particular attention to the Fosse Ardeatine Massacre. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the occupation of Rome in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site, museum details the underground struggle, exhibiting manifestos and handbills of the resistance. It provides information about those imprisoned in Via Tasso and pays particular attention to the Fosse Ardeatine Massacre. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the occupation of Rome in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site, museum details the underground struggle, exhibiting manifestos and handbills of the resistance. It provides information about those imprisoned in Via Tasso and pays particular attention to the Fosse Ardeatine Massacre. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the occupation of Rome in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site, museum details the underground struggle, exhibiting manifestos and handbills of the resistance. It provides information about those imprisoned in Via Tasso and pays particular attention to the Fosse Ardeatine Massacre. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the life in the prison of via Tasso in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site it provides information about those imprisoned in Via Tasso. In some of the cells writings in pencil on the plaster and other graffiti provide touching messages of life and freedom, often written by prisoners nearing death.[ The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the occupation of Rome in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site, museum details the underground struggle, exhibiting manifestos and handbills of the resistance. It provides information about those imprisoned in Via Tasso and pays particular attention to the Fosse Ardeatine Massacre. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the civic victims of the German occupation of Rome in the first floor of the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the civic victims of the German occupation of Rome in the first floor of the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the Massacre of the Fosse Ardeatine in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site it provides information that concerns the Ardeatine Massacre, a German reprisal for the Via Rasella attack with 336 victims gunned down, a lot of them prisoners of via Tasso. In some of the cells writings in pencil on the plaster and other graffiti provide touching messages of life and freedom, often written by prisoners nearing death.[ The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the deportations in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site it provides information that concerns the details the persecution of Rome's Jews, with copies of newspaper reports and posters imposing bans and anti-Jewish orders and the deportation the arrest by the SS of 1259 Jewish citizens from the Roman Ghetto in October 1943. In some of the cells writings in pencil on the plaster and other graffiti provide touching messages of life and freedom, often written by prisoners nearing death.[ The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the defense of Rome in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site, museum details the underground struggle, exhibiting manifestos and handbills of the resistance. It provides information about those imprisoned in Via Tasso and pays particular attention to the Fosse Ardeatine Massacre. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Material documenting the occupation of Rome in the first floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. In addition to recording the torture that took place on the site, museum details the underground struggle, exhibiting manifestos and handbills of the resistance. It provides information about those imprisoned in Via Tasso and pays particular attention to the Fosse Ardeatine Massacre. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cells in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The second floor contains five cells. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 5 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 5 was a kitchen converted into an solitary confinement. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 5 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 5 was a kitchen converted into an solitary confinement. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cells in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The second floor contains five cells. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 1 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell number 1 was the largest and concerns the Ardeatine Massacre a German reprisal for the Via Rasella attack with 336 victims gunned down. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 1 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell number 1 was the largest and concerns the Ardeatine Massacre a German reprisal for the Via Rasella attack with 336 victims gunned down. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 1 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell number 1 was the largest and concerns the Ardeatine Massacre a German reprisal for the Via Rasella attack with 336 victims gunned down. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 1 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell number 1 was the largest and concerns the Ardeatine Massacre a German reprisal for the Via Rasella attack with 336 victims gunned down. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 1 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell number 1 was the largest and concerns the Ardeatine Massacre a German reprisal for the Via Rasella attack with 336 victims gunned down. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 3 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 3 is devoted to Forte Bravetta, a location on Rome's Janiculum that was used by the Germans for executions, and to the people who died there. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 3 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 3 is devoted to Forte Bravetta, a location on Rome's Janiculum that was used by the Germans for executions, and to the people who died there. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 3 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 3 is devoted to Forte Bravetta, a location on Rome's Janiculum that was used by the Germans for executions, and to the people who died there. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 3 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 3 is devoted to Forte Bravetta, a location on Rome's Janiculum that was used by the Germans for executions, and to the people who died there. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 3 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 3 is devoted to Forte Bravetta, a location on Rome's Janiculum that was used by the Germans for executions, and to the people who died there. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell number 3 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 3 is devoted to Forte Bravetta, a location on Rome's Janiculum that was used by the Germans for executions, and to the people who died there. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 2 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 2 was used for solitary confinement. This, and one on the upper floor, was not covered with wallpaper and displays evidence of messages scratched in the plaster by the prisoners. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 4 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 4 remembers the 14 prisoners taken by the SS when they retreated from Rome, and their execution at La Storta on 4 June 1944. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 4 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 4 remembers the 14 prisoners taken by the SS when they retreated from Rome, and their execution at La Storta on 4 June 1944. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 2 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 2 was used for solitary confinement. This, and one on the upper floor, was not covered with wallpaper and displays evidence of messages scratched in the plaster by the prisoners. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 4 in the second floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 4 remembers the 14 prisoners taken by the SS when they retreated from Rome, and their execution at La Storta on 4 June 1944. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cells in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The third floor has 5 cells the exhibition is divided in two apartments.. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 10 in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The kitchen was converted into a cell by the SS. The room remebers the women who where victim of the repression. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 10 in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The kitchen was converted into a cell by the SS. The room remebers the women who where victim of the repression. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 10 in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The kitchen was converted into a cell by the SS. The room remebers the women who where victim of the repression. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cells in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The third floor has 5 cells the exhibition is divided in two apartments.. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 11 in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 11 displays newspapers and other memories of the resistance and contains the Italian flag raised on the Capitoline Hill in Rome on the day of Liberation. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 11 in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 11 displays newspapers and other memories of the resistance and contains the Italian flag raised on the Capitoline Hill in Rome on the day of Liberation. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 13 in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy.Cell 13 displays newspapers and other memories of the resistance. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 13 in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy.Cell 13 displays newspapers and other memories of the resistance. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 11 in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 11 displays newspapers and other memories of the resistance and contains the Italian flag raised on the Capitoline Hill in Rome on the day of Liberation. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Cell 11 in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. Cell 11 displays newspapers and other memories of the resistance and contains the Italian flag raised on the Capitoline Hill in Rome on the day of Liberation. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Room dedicated to the Jewish persecution in the third floor of the the Museum of the Liberation of Rome in Via Tasso 145 close to the basilica of St. John Lateran in Rome, Italy. The second apartment of the third floor in addition to recording the torture that took place on the site, details the persecution of Rome's Jews, with copies of newspaper reports and posters imposing bans and anti-Jewish orders. One exhibition room records the arrest by the SS of 1259 Jewish citizens from the Roman Ghetto in October 1943. The building housing the museum was used by the SS to torture members of the Italian Resistance in the first half of 1944. Under Kappler the apartments located on three floors were transformed into a prison, with the rooms being turned into cells. In January 1944 all windows were walled up to facilitate imprisonment, interrogations and torture of some of the most important figures of the Italian resistance, with an estimated 2000 people passing through the building. Following donation of the apartments occupied by the SS to the Italian State in 1950 the museum was established to record the period of German occupation and Rome's subsequent liberation in 1957.
Back to Top