The Arch of Drusus at the beginning of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The Arch of Drusus is an ancient arch close to the First Mile of the Appian Way and next to the Porta San Sebastiano. It is now generally agreed that it has nothing to do with Nero Claudius Drusus, the conqueror of the Germans. The Aqua Antoniniana, a branch of the Aqua Marcia, ran over this arch to provide water for the Bathes of Caracalla.
The Arch of Drusus at the beginning of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The Arch of Drusus is an ancient arch close to the First Mile of the Appian Way and next to the Porta San Sebastiano. It is now generally agreed that it has nothing to do with Nero Claudius Drusus, the conqueror of the Germans. The Aqua Antoniniana, a branch of the Aqua Marcia, ran over this arch to provide water for the Bathes of Caracalla.
The Arch of Drusus at the beginning of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The Arch of Drusus is an ancient arch close to the First Mile of the Appian Way and next to the Porta San Sebastiano. It is now generally agreed that it has nothing to do with Nero Claudius Drusus, the conqueror of the Germans. The Aqua Antoniniana, a branch of the Aqua Marcia, ran over this arch to provide water for the Bathes of Caracalla.
The Aurelian Walls near the Sebastians' Gate at the beginning of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy.. The city wall was built between 271 AD and 275 AD, during the reign of the Roman Emperors Aurelian and Probus. They superseded the earlier Servian Wall constructed during the 4th century BC. The full circuit ran for 19 km surrounding an area of 13.7 km2. By 500 AD, the circuit possessed 383 towers, 7,020 crenellations, 18 main gates, 5 postern gates, 116 latrines, and 2,066 large external windows. The Aurelian Walls remain remarkably well-preserved today, largely the result of their constant use as Rome's primary fortification until the 19th century. The Wall Museum near the Porta San Sebastiano offers information on the walls' construction and how the defenses operated.
The Aurelian Walls near the Sebastians' Gate at the beginning of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy.. The city wall was built between 271 AD and 275 AD, during the reign of the Roman Emperors Aurelian and Probus. They superseded the earlier Servian Wall constructed during the 4th century BC. The full circuit ran for 19 km surrounding an area of 13.7 km2. By 500 AD, the circuit possessed 383 towers, 7,020 crenellations, 18 main gates, 5 postern gates, 116 latrines, and 2,066 large external windows. The Aurelian Walls remain remarkably well-preserved today, largely the result of their constant use as Rome's primary fortification until the 19th century. The Wall Museum near the Porta San Sebastiano offers information on the walls' construction and how the defenses operated.
The Aurelian Walls near the Sebastians' Gate at the beginning of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy.. The city wall was built between 271 AD and 275 AD, during the reign of the Roman Emperors Aurelian and Probus. They superseded the earlier Servian Wall constructed during the 4th century BC. The full circuit ran for 19 km surrounding an area of 13.7 km2. By 500 AD, the circuit possessed 383 towers, 7,020 crenellations, 18 main gates, 5 postern gates, 116 latrines, and 2,066 large external windows. The Aurelian Walls remain remarkably well-preserved today, largely the result of their constant use as Rome's primary fortification until the 19th century. The Wall Museum near the Porta San Sebastiano offers information on the walls' construction and how the defenses operated.
The Aurelian Walls near the Sebastians' Gate at the beginning of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy.. The city wall was built between 271 AD and 275 AD, during the reign of the Roman Emperors Aurelian and Probus. They superseded the earlier Servian Wall constructed during the 4th century BC. The full circuit ran for 19 km surrounding an area of 13.7 km2. By 500 AD, the circuit possessed 383 towers, 7,020 crenellations, 18 main gates, 5 postern gates, 116 latrines, and 2,066 large external windows. The Aurelian Walls remain remarkably well-preserved today, largely the result of their constant use as Rome's primary fortification until the 19th century. The Wall Museum near the Porta San Sebastiano offers information on the walls' construction and how the defenses operated.
Porta San Sebastiano at the beginning of the Appian Way today via di Porta San Sebastiano in Rome, Italy. The Porta San Sebastiano is the largest and one of the best-preserved gates passing through the Aurelian Walls in Rome. Originally known as the Porta Appia, the gate sat astride the Appian Way, the regina viarum (queen of the roads), which originated at the Porta Capena in the Servian Wall. The original structure was constructed by Aurelian ca. AD 275 and included a double-arched opening surmounted by bow windows and two semi-cylindrical towers. The façade was faced with travertine. After a later restoration, the towers were enlarged, increased, and linked, through two parallel walls, to the preexisting Arch of Drusus.
Porta San Sebastiano at the beginning of the Appian Way today via di Porta San Sebastiano in Rome, Italy. The Porta San Sebastiano is the largest and one of the best-preserved gates passing through the Aurelian Walls in Rome. Originally known as the Porta Appia, the gate sat astride the Appian Way, the regina viarum (queen of the roads), which originated at the Porta Capena in the Servian Wall. The original structure was constructed by Aurelian ca. AD 275 and included a double-arched opening surmounted by bow windows and two semi-cylindrical towers. The façade was faced with travertine. After a later restoration, the towers were enlarged, increased, and linked, through two parallel walls, to the preexisting Arch of Drusus.
Porta San Sebastiano at the beginning of the Appian Way today via di Porta San Sebastiano in Rome, Italy. The Porta San Sebastiano is the largest and one of the best-preserved gates passing through the Aurelian Walls in Rome. Originally known as the Porta Appia, the gate sat astride the Appian Way, the regina viarum (queen of the roads), which originated at the Porta Capena in the Servian Wall. The original structure was constructed by Aurelian ca. AD 275 and included a double-arched opening surmounted by bow windows and two semi-cylindrical towers. The façade was faced with travertine. After a later restoration, the towers were enlarged, increased, and linked, through two parallel walls, to the preexisting Arch of Drusus.
Porta San Sebastiano at the beginning of the Appian Way today via di Porta San Sebastiano in Rome, Italy. The Porta San Sebastiano is the largest and one of the best-preserved gates passing through the Aurelian Walls in Rome. Originally known as the Porta Appia, the gate sat astride the Appian Way, the regina viarum (queen of the roads), which originated at the Porta Capena in the Servian Wall. The original structure was constructed by Aurelian ca. AD 275 and included a double-arched opening surmounted by bow windows and two semi-cylindrical towers. The façade was faced with travertine. After a later restoration, the towers were enlarged, increased, and linked, through two parallel walls, to the preexisting Arch of Drusus.
Porta San Sebastiano at the beginning of the Appian Way today via di Porta San Sebastiano in Rome, Italy. The Porta San Sebastiano is the largest and one of the best-preserved gates passing through the Aurelian Walls in Rome. Originally known as the Porta Appia, the gate sat astride the Appian Way, the regina viarum (queen of the roads), which originated at the Porta Capena in the Servian Wall. The original structure was constructed by Aurelian ca. AD 275 and included a double-arched opening surmounted by bow windows and two semi-cylindrical towers. The façade was faced with travertine. After a later restoration, the towers were enlarged, increased, and linked, through two parallel walls, to the preexisting Arch of Drusus.
Porta San Sebastiano at the beginning of the Appian Way today via di Porta San Sebastiano in Rome, Italy. The Porta San Sebastiano is the largest and one of the best-preserved gates passing through the Aurelian Walls in Rome. Originally known as the Porta Appia, the gate sat astride the Appian Way, the regina viarum (queen of the roads), which originated at the Porta Capena in the Servian Wall. The original structure was constructed by Aurelian ca. AD 275 and included a double-arched opening surmounted by bow windows and two semi-cylindrical towers. The façade was faced with travertine. After a later restoration, the towers were enlarged, increased, and linked, through two parallel walls, to the preexisting Arch of Drusus.
The Arch of Drusus at the beginning of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The Arch of Drusus is an ancient arch close to the First Mile of the Appian Way and next to the Porta San Sebastiano. It is now generally agreed that it has nothing to do with Nero Claudius Drusus, the conqueror of the Germans. The Aqua Antoniniana, a branch of the Aqua Marcia, ran over this arch to provide water for the Bathes of Caracalla.
The Arch of Drusus at the beginning of the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The Arch of Drusus is an ancient arch close to the First Mile of the Appian Way and next to the Porta San Sebastiano. It is now generally agreed that it has nothing to do with Nero Claudius Drusus, the conqueror of the Germans. The Aqua Antoniniana, a branch of the Aqua Marcia, ran over this arch to provide water for the Bathes of Caracalla.
view of a bar on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The Appian Way is one of the earliest and strategically most important Roman roads of the ancient republic. It connected Rome to Brindisi, in southeast. Its importance is indicated by its common name, regina viarum, the queen of the roads.
view of a bar on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The Appian Way is one of the earliest and strategically most important Roman roads of the ancient republic. It connected Rome to Brindisi, in southeast. Its importance is indicated by its common name, regina viarum, the queen of the roads.
Towers of the Circus of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. Known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla it is part of a complex of buildings erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312. The villa is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex. The towers would have contained the mechanism for raising the carceres (starting gates), which were positioned on the course between the towers. Once out of the gates, the chariots would race down the track, the full 503 meters (550 yd) length of which can still be seen. The Circus itself is the best preserved in the area of Rome, and is second only in size to the Circus Maximus. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the circus from the west end, where the remains of the two still imposing towers are located. The archeological complex today can be visited, the admission is free.
Towers of the Circus of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. Known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla it is part of a complex of buildings erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312. The villa is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex. The towers would have contained the mechanism for raising the carceres (starting gates), which were positioned on the course between the towers. Once out of the gates, the chariots would race down the track, the full 503 meters (550 yd) length of which can still be seen. The Circus itself is the best preserved in the area of Rome, and is second only in size to the Circus Maximus. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the circus from the west end, where the remains of the two still imposing towers are located. The archeological complex today can be visited, the admission is free.
Towers of the Circus of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. Known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla it is part of a complex of buildings erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312. The villa is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex. The towers would have contained the mechanism for raising the carceres (starting gates), which were positioned on the course between the towers. Once out of the gates, the chariots would race down the track, the full 503 meters (550 yd) length of which can still be seen. The Circus itself is the best preserved in the area of Rome, and is second only in size to the Circus Maximus. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the circus from the west end, where the remains of the two still imposing towers are located. The archeological complex today can be visited, the admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
Towers of the Circus of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. Known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla it is part of a complex of buildings erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312. The villa is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex. The towers would have contained the mechanism for raising the carceres (starting gates), which were positioned on the course between the towers. Once out of the gates, the chariots would race down the track, the full 503 meters (550 yd) length of which can still be seen. The Circus itself is the best preserved in the area of Rome, and is second only in size to the Circus Maximus. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the circus from the west end, where the remains of the two still imposing towers are located. The archeological complex today can be visited, the admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Circus of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. Known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla it is part of a complex of buildings erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312. The villa is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex. The Circus of Maxentius, the Familial Mausoleum, the remains of the palace compose today the archeological area. The Circus itself is the best preserved in the area of Rome, and is second only in size to the Circus Maximus. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus in the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. The so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus, surely was intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive, when it received in 309 as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Casino Torlonia in the ancient villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The villa erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312 is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex. After the death of Maxentius the area changed property until being owned by the Torlonia family in the 18th century. The Circus of Maxentius, the Familial Mausoleum, the remains of the palace compose today the archeological area. The Circus itself is the best preserved in the area of Rome, and is second only in size to the Circus Maximus. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus in the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. The so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus, surely was intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive, when it received in 309 as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The porticoes of the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius between AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. Within the porticoes rises the so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (died 309), a familial tomb, surely intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive and that received as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus in the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. The so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus, surely was intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive, when it received in 309 as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus in the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. The so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus, surely was intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive, when it received in 309 as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus in the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. The so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus, surely was intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive, when it received in 309 as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus in the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. The so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus, surely was intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive, when it received in 309 as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus in the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. The so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus, surely was intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive, when it received in 309 as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
The Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus in the Villa of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. The complex of buildings composing the villa was erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312 between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella. The so called Mausoleum of Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus, surely was intended for Maxentius himself whilst still alive, when it received in 309 as its occupant Maxentius' only son. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
Towers of the Circus of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. Known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla it is part of a complex of buildings erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312. The villa is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex. The towers would have contained the mechanism for raising the carceres (starting gates), which were positioned on the course between the towers. Once out of the gates, the chariots would race down the track, the full 503 meters (550 yd) length of which can still be seen. The Circus itself is the best preserved in the area of Rome, and is second only in size to the Circus Maximus. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the circus from the west end, where the remains of the two still imposing towers are located. The archeological complex today can be visited, the admission is free.
The Circus of Maxentius on the Appian Way in Rome, Italy. Known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla it is part of a complex of buildings erected by emperor Maxentius around AD 306 and 312. The villa is situated between the second and third miles of the Via Appia near the basilica and catacombs of San Sebastiano and the imposing late republican tomb of Caecilia Metella, which dominates the hill that rises immediately to the east of the complex. The Circus of Maxentius, the Familial Mausoleum, the remains of the palace compose today the archeological area. The Circus itself is the best preserved in the area of Rome, and is second only in size to the Circus Maximus. The complex was probably never used after the death of Maxentius in AD 312. The modern-day visitor enters the archeological area from the west end, where the remains of the circus are located. The admission is free.
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