The Palazzo Senatorio sits on Rome's Piazza del Campidoglio, the administrative square that was redesigned by Michelangelo, above the Forum and the gleaming monument to Vittorio Emanuele. Today Palazzo Senatorio is the headquarter of the city council of Rome. There was an ancient building here, the Tabularium, but the Palazzo Senatorio was constructed in the 12th century, a heavy stone structure with an arcaded upper story, following the standard Medieval civic building model. It was restructured in the 1500s by Michelangelo and restyled in Renaissance splendor, retaining the grand staircase and making it an elegant, commanding presence in the center of the piazza. An ancient statue is dedicated to Rome itself. It is next to Capitoline Museums.
The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The two porticoes on opposite sides and the large open-air space contain important examples of Roman sculpture. At the end of the nineteenth century, the reliefs with personifications of Provinces and trophies of arms were placed in the courtyard; they were found in the Temple of Hadrian in Piazza di Pietra. The reliefs depict the personifications of the provinces subject to the Roman Empire during its greatest expansion.Along the righthand wall of the courtyard, containing the embedded remains of three archways belonging to the palazzo's original XV century structure, is a row of fragments from a colossal statue of Constantine from the Basilica of Maxentium.
Foot of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
Foot of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
Foot of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
The marble fragments of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome. The creation of the Capitoline Museums has been traced back to 1471, when Pope Sixtus IV donated a group of bronze statues of great symbolic value to the People of Rome.
Hand of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
Hand of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
Head of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Capitoline museum in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
Arm of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The two porticoes on opposite sides and the large open-air space contain important examples of Roman sculpture. At the end of the nineteenth century, the reliefs with personifications of Provinces and trophies of arms were placed in the courtyard; they were found in the Temple of Hadrian in Piazza di Pietra. The reliefs depict the personifications of the provinces subject to the Roman Empire during its greatest expansion.Along the righthand wall of the courtyard, containing the embedded remains of three archways belonging to the palazzo's original XV century structure, is a row of fragments from a colossal statue of Constantine from the Basilica of Maxentium.
Head of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Capitoline museum in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
Head of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Capitoline museum in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The two porticoes on opposite sides and the large open-air space contain important examples of Roman sculpture. At the end of the nineteenth century, the reliefs with personifications of Provinces and trophies of arms were placed in the courtyard; they were found in the Temple of Hadrian in Piazza di Pietra. The reliefs depict the personifications of the provinces subject to the Roman Empire during its greatest expansion.Along the righthand wall of the courtyard, containing the embedded remains of three archways belonging to the palazzo's original XV century structure, is a row of fragments from a colossal statue of Constantine from the Basilica of Maxentium.
Hand of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
Hand of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The marble fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome.
personifications of Provinces and trophies of arms in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy; they were found in the Temple of Hadrian in Piazza di Pietra. The reliefs depict the personifications of the provinces subject to the Roman Empire during its greatest expansion.
The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The two porticoes on opposite sides and the large open-air space contain important examples of Roman sculpture. At the end of the nineteenth century, the reliefs with personifications of Provinces and trophies of arms were placed in the courtyard; they were found in the Temple of Hadrian in Piazza di Pietra. The reliefs depict the personifications of the provinces subject to the Roman Empire during its greatest expansion.Along the righthand wall of the courtyard, containing the embedded remains of three archways belonging to the palazzo's original XV century structure, is a row of fragments from a colossal statue of Constantine from the Basilica of Maxentium.
personifications of Provinces and trophies of arms in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy; they were found in the Temple of Hadrian in Piazza di Pietra. The reliefs depict the personifications of the provinces subject to the Roman Empire during its greatest expansion.
personifications of Provinces and trophies of arms in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy; they were found in the Temple of Hadrian in Piazza di Pietra. The reliefs depict the personifications of the provinces subject to the Roman Empire during its greatest expansion.
The marble fragments of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome. The creation of the Capitoline Museums has been traced back to 1471, when Pope Sixtus IV donated a group of bronze statues of great symbolic value to the People of Rome.
The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The two porticoes on opposite sides and the large open-air space contain important examples of Roman sculpture. At the end of the nineteenth century, the reliefs with personifications of Provinces and trophies of arms were placed in the courtyard; they were found in the Temple of Hadrian in Piazza di Pietra. The reliefs depict the personifications of the provinces subject to the Roman Empire during its greatest expansion.Along the righthand wall of the courtyard, containing the embedded remains of three archways belonging to the palazzo's original XV century structure, is a row of fragments from a colossal statue of Constantine from the Basilica of Maxentium.
The marble fragments of a colossal statue of Constantine (306-337 AD) in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy. The fragments of the statue were discovered in 1486 in the Basilica of Maxentius in the Roman Forum. The courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori is a very suggestive space of its monumental architectural elements and fragments of ancient colossal structures. From the beginning of the history of Capitoline museum, as it was customary in the palaces of the Roman nobility, some of the most significant ancient works of art were collected in the Capitoline as a witness to the greatness of Rome. The creation of the Capitoline Museums has been traced back to 1471, when Pope Sixtus IV donated a group of bronze statues of great symbolic value to the People of Rome.
The underground gallery (Galleria di Congiunzione) links the Capitoline palazzos, Palazzo Nuovo and Palazzo dei Conservatori. It was built at the end of the 1930s underneath Piazza del Campidoglio; inside the gallery we can see the remains of two-storey ancient Roman dwellings dating back to the II century AD. The Gallery currently houses the Musei Capitolini new Galleria Lapidaria, with a selection of the most important items from the Capitoline's epigraphic collection.
The underground gallery (Galleria di Congiunzione) links the Capitoline palazzos, Palazzo Nuovo and Palazzo dei Conservatori. It was built at the end of the 1930s underneath Piazza del Campidoglio; inside the gallery we can see the remains of two-storey ancient Roman dwellings dating back to the II century AD. The Gallery currently houses the Musei Capitolini new Galleria Lapidaria, with a selection of the most important items from the Capitoline's epigraphic collection.
The underground gallery (Galleria di Congiunzione) links the Capitoline palazzos, Palazzo Nuovo and Palazzo dei Conservatori. It was built at the end of the 1930s underneath Piazza del Campidoglio; inside the gallery we can see the remains of two-storey ancient Roman dwellings dating back to the II century AD. The Gallery currently houses the Musei Capitolini new Galleria Lapidaria, with a selection of the most important items from the Capitoline's epigraphic collection.
Portraits in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Sarcophagus in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Portraits in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Portraits in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Portraits in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Sarcophagus in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Portraits in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Lobby, porticoed ground-floor corridor opening onto the Courtyard in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy
Lobby, porticoed ground-floor corridor opening onto the Courtyard in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy
Colossal statue restored as Oceanus: Marforio in the coutryard of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The colossal statue in marble dates from the 1rst - 2nd century AD and was found in Rome near the church of S. Pietro in Carcere.
Egyptian Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Most of the pieces were part of Temple of Isis and Serapis a double temple in Rome dedicated to the Egyptian deities Isis and Serapis on the Campus Martius.
Egyptian Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Most of the pieces were part of Temple of Isis and Serapis a double temple in Rome dedicated to the Egyptian deities Isis and Serapis on the Campus Martius.
Egyptian Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Most of the pieces were part of Temple of Isis and Serapis a double temple in Rome dedicated to the Egyptian deities Isis and Serapis on the Campus Martius.
Sarcophagus in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy The three small rooms to the right of the large main door of the Palazzo Nuovo house important epigraphic documents, portraits and sarcophagi.
Monumental Staircase in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. On the landing between the two flights of the large staircase leading up to the first floor we can find the fragments of some sarcophagi, busts and statues.
Monumental Staircase in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. On the landing between the two flights of the large staircase leading up to the first floor we can find the fragments of some sarcophagi, busts and statues.
Monumental Staircase in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. On the landing between the two flights of the large staircase leading up to the first floor we can find the fragments of some sarcophagi, busts and statues.
The centre of the room features the so-called Dying Galatian, one of the best-known and most important works in the museum. It is a replica of one of the sculptures in the ex-voto group dedicated to Pergamon by Attalus I to commemorate the victories over the Galatians in the III and II centuries BC.
The Dying Galatian, one of the best-known and most important works in the in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Apollo Citharoedus in the Hall of the Galatian in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Capitoline Antinous in the Hall of the Galatian in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Sculpture of Satyr from an original of Praxiteles in the Hall of the Galatian in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Statue of Cupid and Psyche From a Greek original of the 2nd century BC in the Hall of the Galatian in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Statue of Cupid and Psyche From a Greek original of the 2nd century BC in the Hall of the Galatian in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
The centre of the room features the so-called Dying Galatian, one of the best-known and most important works in the museum. It is a replica of one of the sculptures in the ex-voto group dedicated to Pergamon by Attalus I to commemorate the victories over the Galatians in the III and II centuries BC.
The two sides of the Gallery are lined with a row of sculptures of various types from different periods arranged according to strictly ornamental criteria. Many statues are Roman copies of original Greek masterpieces, now lost. Modern restoration has, in some cases, greatly altered the original iconography. Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy
Hall of the Faun in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The Faun in ancient red marble which gives its name to this room comes from Hadrian's Villa. The walls feature a series of inscriptions, including the famous bronze table with the Lex de imperio Vespasiani, with which the Senate authorised the transfer of power to the Emperor Vespasian in 69 AD.
Hall of the Faun in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The Faun in ancient red marble which gives its name to this room comes from Hadrian's Villa. The walls feature a series of inscriptions, including the famous bronze table with the Lex de imperio Vespasiani, with which the Senate authorised the transfer of power to the Emperor Vespasian in 69 AD.
Hall of the Faun in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The Faun in ancient red marble which gives its name to this room comes from Hadrian's Villa. The walls feature a series of inscriptions, including the famous bronze table with the Lex de imperio Vespasiani, with which the Senate authorised the transfer of power to the Emperor Vespasian in 69 AD.
Hall of the Faun in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The Faun in ancient red marble which gives its name to this room comes from Hadrian's Villa. The walls feature a series of inscriptions, including the famous bronze table with the Lex de imperio Vespasiani, with which the Senate authorised the transfer of power to the Emperor Vespasian in 69 AD.
Statue of Cupid and Psyche From a Greek original of the 2nd century BC in the Hall of the Galatian in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Hall of the Galatian in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The centre of the room features the so-called Dying Galatian, one of the best-known and most important works in the museum. It is a replica of one of the sculptures in the ex-voto group dedicated to Pergamon by Attalus I to commemorate the victories over the Galatians in the III and II centuries BC.
The centre of the room features the so-called Dying Galatian, one of the best-known and most important works in the museum. It is a replica of one of the sculptures in the ex-voto group dedicated to Pergamon by Attalus I to commemorate the victories over the Galatians in the III and II centuries BC.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
Hall of the Philosophers of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. portraits of Greek and Roman philosophers and men of letters, very popular with the Romans for the decoration of their public and private buildings, The arrangement s along the same lines as that in the Hall of the Emperors. Many of the portraits are late reproductions and were carried out long after the lifetime of the characters they represent.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The two sides of the Gallery are lined with a row of sculptures of various types from different periods arranged according to strictly ornamental criteria. Many statues are Roman copies of original Greek masterpieces, now lost. Modern restoration has, in some cases, greatly altered the original iconography.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The two sides of the Gallery are lined with a row of sculptures of various types from different periods arranged according to strictly ornamental criteria. Many statues are Roman copies of original Greek masterpieces, now lost. Modern restoration has, in some cases, greatly altered the original iconography.
Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The two sides of the Gallery are lined with a row of sculptures of various types from different periods arranged according to strictly ornamental criteria. Many statues are Roman copies of original Greek masterpieces, now lost. Modern restoration has, in some cases, greatly altered the original iconography.
Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The two sides of the Gallery are lined with a row of sculptures of various types from different periods arranged according to strictly ornamental criteria. Many statues are Roman copies of original Greek masterpieces, now lost. Modern restoration has, in some cases, greatly altered the original iconography.
Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The two sides of the Gallery are lined with a row of sculptures of various types from different periods arranged according to strictly ornamental criteria. Many statues are Roman copies of original Greek masterpieces, now lost. Modern restoration has, in some cases, greatly altered the original iconography.
Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The two sides of the Gallery are lined with a row of sculptures of various types from different periods arranged according to strictly ornamental criteria. Many statues are Roman copies of original Greek masterpieces, now lost. Modern restoration has, in some cases, greatly altered the original iconography.
Statue of Capitoline Venus in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The sculpture, copy from an original by Praxiteles (4th century BC) of slightly larger than life size dimensions, was found near Basilica of San Vitale around 1666-1670. It is made of precious marble (probably Parian), and represents Venus-Aphrodite nude and in contemplation, coming out of her bath.
Statue of Capitoline Venus in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The sculpture, copy from an original by Praxiteles (4th century BC) of slightly larger than life size dimensions, was found near Basilica of San Vitale around 1666-1670. It is made of precious marble (probably Parian), and represents Venus-Aphrodite nude and in contemplation, coming out of her bath.
Statue of Capitoline Venus in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The sculpture, copy from an original by Praxiteles (4th century BC) of slightly larger than life size dimensions, was found near Basilica of San Vitale around 1666-1670. It is made of precious marble (probably Parian), and represents Venus-Aphrodite nude and in contemplation, coming out of her bath.
Statue of Capitoline Venus in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The sculpture, copy from an original by Praxiteles (4th century BC) of slightly larger than life size dimensions, was found near Basilica of San Vitale around 1666-1670. It is made of precious marble (probably Parian), and represents Venus-Aphrodite nude and in contemplation, coming out of her bath.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Hall of the Emperors of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Portraits of the emperors and empresses and other important personages of the Imperial Age are lined up on the marble shelves along the wall, though in some cases their attribution is in doubt. The collection testifies the development of Roman portrait painting from the Imperial Age to the Late Ancient period.
Statue of Pothos restored as Apollo Citharoedusin in the Great Hall of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. From a Greek original by Skopas (4th century BC)
Asclepius in the Great Hall of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The sculpture part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, was discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian
Hall of the Faun in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The Faun in ancient red marble which gives its name to this room comes from Hadrian's Villa. The walls feature a series of inscriptions, including the famous bronze table with the Lex de imperio Vespasiani, with which the Senate authorised the transfer of power to the Emperor Vespasian in 69 AD.
The centre of the room features the so-called Dying Galatian, one of the best-known and most important works in the museum. It is a replica of one of the sculptures in the ex-voto group dedicated to Pergamon by Attalus I to commemorate the victories over the Galatians in the III and II centuries BC.
Hall of the Faun in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The Faun in ancient red marble which gives its name to this room comes from Hadrian's Villa. The walls feature a series of inscriptions, including the famous bronze table with the Lex de imperio Vespasiani, with which the Senate authorised the transfer of power to the Emperor Vespasian in 69 AD.
Hall of the Faun in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The Faun in ancient red marble which gives its name to this room comes from Hadrian's Villa. The walls feature a series of inscriptions, including the famous bronze table with the Lex de imperio Vespasiani, with which the Senate authorised the transfer of power to the Emperor Vespasian in 69 AD.
The Faun in ancient red marble from Hadrian's Villa in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Statue of Apollo in the Great Hall of Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. Copy of the Omphalos Apollo attributed to Kalamis (480-460 BC)
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
The Great Hall in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The great central hall as it was called in the Eighteenth century, is, for its size and monumentality, the most representative area of the Museum. It has has preserved its original wall decorations and its XVI century gilded wood coffered ceiling. At the centre of the hall are placed, with great visual impact, five black marble masterpieces: at the ends of the room there are two statues, smaller than life-size, which represent Zeus and Asclepius. These precious sculptures, part of Cardinal Albani’s collection, were discovered in 1711 in the excavations of an imperial villa at Anzio, which was frequented by Nero and Hadrian. Another colossal basanite statue depicts the Baby Hercules, with his iconographic attributes (the apples of the Hesperides and the lion’s skin); it was found on the Aventine and purchased by the Conservators in 1570.
personifications of Provinces and trophies of arms in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori part of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, Italy; they were found in the Temple of Hadrian in Piazza di Pietra. The reliefs depict the personifications of the provinces subject to the Roman Empire during its greatest expansion.
Drunk old woman marble sculpture from hellenistic period in the Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Torso of Discobolus restored as wounded warrior in the Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The ancient part: copy of torso of discobolo by Mirone (460 BC) of the marble sculpture is from the 1st century AD.It was restaured by Pierre-Etienne Monnot (1658-1733).
Torso of Discobolus restored as wounded warrior in the Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The ancient part: copy of torso of discobolo by Mirone (460 BC) of the marble sculpture is from the 1st century AD.It was restaured by Pierre-Etienne Monnot (1658-1733).
Drunk old woman marble sculpture from hellenistic period in the Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Statue of Eros stringing his bow in the Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The marble sculpture is a copy from an original of Lisippo
Torso of Discobolus restored as wounded warrior in the Hall of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The ancient part: copy of torso of discobolo by Mirone (460 BC) of the marble sculpture is from the 1st century AD.It was restaured by Pierre-Etienne Monnot (1658-1733).
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Mosaic of the Doves in the room of the doves, Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Statue of young girl with dove in the room of the doves, Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
Room of the doves in the Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. This room owes its name to one of the two mosaics herein exhibited, found in Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli. The glass-fronted cabinets contain other particularly interesting exhibits; in addition to bas-relief fragments of a Tabula Iliaca with a miniaturist representation of scenes from the Iliad, we can see a series of bronze tables with engraved laws and honorary inscriptions.
statue in a monumental Staircase in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. On the landing between the two flights of the large staircase leading up to the first floor we can find the fragments of some sarcophagi, busts and statues.
The centre of the room features the so-called Dying Galatian, one of the best-known and most important works in the museum. It is a replica of one of the sculptures in the ex-voto group dedicated to Pergamon by Attalus I to commemorate the victories over the Galatians in the III and II centuries BC.
The Dying Galatian, one of the best-known and most important works in the in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy.
The Courtyard with a large fountain with the colossal statue of a River god, known as Marforio, Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The three large grey granite pillars with a relief frieze portraying Egyptian high priests originate from the sanctuary of Isis and Serapis in the Campus Martius.
The Courtyard with a large fountain with the colossal statue of a River god, known as Marforio, Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The three large grey granite pillars with a relief frieze portraying Egyptian high priests originate from the sanctuary of Isis and Serapis in the Campus Martius.
Lobby, porticoed ground-floor corridor opening onto the Courtyard in Palazzo Nuovo part of the Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy
Colossal statue restored as Oceanus: Marforio in the coutryard of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The colossal statue in marble dates from the 1rst - 2nd century AD and was found in Rome near the church of S. Pietro in Carcere.
Colossal statue restored as Oceanus: Marforio in the coutryard of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The colossal statue in marble dates from the 1rst - 2nd century AD and was found in Rome near the church of S. Pietro in Carcere.
Satiro Della Valle in the coutryard of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The couple of marble sculptures from an original of the Hellenistic period where found in Rome near the Theater of Pompey in Campus Martius.
Colossal statue restored as Oceanus: Marforio in the coutryard of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The colossal statue in marble dates from the 1rst - 2nd century AD and was found in Rome near the church of S. Pietro in Carcere.
Satiro Della Valle in the coutryard of Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The couple of marble sculptures from an original of the Hellenistic period where found in Rome near the Theater of Pompey in Campus Martius.
The Courtyard with a large fountain with the colossal statue of a River god, known as Marforio, Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The three large grey granite pillars with a relief frieze portraying Egyptian high priests originate from the sanctuary of Isis and Serapis in the Campus Martius.
The Courtyard with a large fountain with the colossal statue of a River god, known as Marforio, Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The three large grey granite pillars with a relief frieze portraying Egyptian high priests originate from the sanctuary of Isis and Serapis in the Campus Martius.
The Courtyard with a large fountain with the colossal statue of a River god, known as Marforio, Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The three large grey granite pillars with a relief frieze portraying Egyptian high priests originate from the sanctuary of Isis and Serapis in the Campus Martius.
The Courtyard with a large fountain with the colossal statue of a River god, known as Marforio, Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Museum of Rome, Italy. The three large grey granite pillars with a relief frieze portraying Egyptian high priests originate from the sanctuary of Isis and Serapis in the Campus Martius.
a Gallery of the Tabularium access from the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The imposing monument, of which only the foundations are preserved, was situated within the Roman Forum, it was on the front slope of the Capitoline Hill, below the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, to the southeast of the Arx and Tarpeian Rock. The core of the building, built in opus caementicium, is divided into cellars, which were once inaccessible and constitute the terracing of the slope (substructio); the upper floors, where the archive was hosted, have been replaced by the medieval Senatorial Palace.
a Gallery of the Tabularium access from the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The imposing monument, of which only the foundations are preserved, was situated within the Roman Forum, it was on the front slope of the Capitoline Hill, below the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, to the southeast of the Arx and Tarpeian Rock. The core of the building, built in opus caementicium, is divided into cellars, which were once inaccessible and constitute the terracing of the slope (substructio); the upper floors, where the archive was hosted, have been replaced by the medieval Senatorial Palace.
a Gallery of the Tabularium access from the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The imposing monument, of which only the foundations are preserved, was situated within the Roman Forum, it was on the front slope of the Capitoline Hill, below the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, to the southeast of the Arx and Tarpeian Rock. The core of the building, built in opus caementicium, is divided into cellars, which were once inaccessible and constitute the terracing of the slope (substructio); the upper floors, where the archive was hosted, have been replaced by the medieval Senatorial Palace.
a Gallery of the Tabularium access from the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The imposing monument, of which only the foundations are preserved, was situated within the Roman Forum, it was on the front slope of the Capitoline Hill, below the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, to the southeast of the Arx and Tarpeian Rock. The core of the building, built in opus caementicium, is divided into cellars, which were once inaccessible and constitute the terracing of the slope (substructio); the upper floors, where the archive was hosted, have been replaced by the medieval Senatorial Palace.
a Gallery of the Tabularium access from the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The imposing monument, of which only the foundations are preserved, was situated within the Roman Forum, it was on the front slope of the Capitoline Hill, below the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, to the southeast of the Arx and Tarpeian Rock. The core of the building, built in opus caementicium, is divided into cellars, which were once inaccessible and constitute the terracing of the slope (substructio); the upper floors, where the archive was hosted, have been replaced by the medieval Senatorial Palace.
a Gallery of the Tabularium access from the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The imposing monument, of which only the foundations are preserved, was situated within the Roman Forum, it was on the front slope of the Capitoline Hill, below the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, to the southeast of the Arx and Tarpeian Rock. The core of the building, built in opus caementicium, is divided into cellars, which were once inaccessible and constitute the terracing of the slope (substructio); the upper floors, where the archive was hosted, have been replaced by the medieval Senatorial Palace.
a Gallery of the Tabularium access from the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The imposing monument, of which only the foundations are preserved, was situated within the Roman Forum, it was on the front slope of the Capitoline Hill, below the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, to the southeast of the Arx and Tarpeian Rock. The core of the building, built in opus caementicium, is divided into cellars, which were once inaccessible and constitute the terracing of the slope (substructio); the upper floors, where the archive was hosted, have been replaced by the medieval Senatorial Palace.
The underground gallery (Galleria di Congiunzione) links the Capitoline palazzos, Palazzo Nuovo and Palazzo dei Conservatori. It was built at the end of the 1930s underneath Piazza del Campidoglio; inside the gallery we can see the remains of two-storey ancient Roman dwellings dating back to the II century AD. The Gallery currently houses the Musei Capitolini new Galleria Lapidaria, with a selection of the most important items from the Capitoline's epigraphic collection.
The underground gallery (Galleria di Congiunzione) links the Capitoline palazzos, Palazzo Nuovo and Palazzo dei Conservatori. It was built at the end of the 1930s underneath Piazza del Campidoglio; inside the gallery we can see the remains of two-storey ancient Roman dwellings dating back to the II century AD. The Gallery currently houses the Musei Capitolini new Galleria Lapidaria, with a selection of the most important items from the Capitoline's epigraphic collection.
Monumental staircase of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy.
Monumental staircase of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy.
Great Hall or Hall of the Horatii and Curiatii part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The fresco decoration of this large room was carried out by Cavalier d'Arpino (Giuseppe Cesari) at the end XVI century and the beginning of the XVII century. This cycle of frescoes illustrates some episodes of the history of Rome as told by Titus Livius. The scenes depict a series of fake tapestries, wrapped with painted festoons of fruit and flowers, lustral vases and trophies of arms. The Great hallwas used for the public hearings of the Council.
Great Hall or Hall of the Horatii and Curiatii part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The fresco decoration of this large room was carried out by Cavalier d'Arpino (Giuseppe Cesari) at the end XVI century and the beginning of the XVII century. This cycle of frescoes illustrates some episodes of the history of Rome as told by Titus Livius. The scenes depict a series of fake tapestries, wrapped with painted festoons of fruit and flowers, lustral vases and trophies of arms. The Great hallwas used for the public hearings of the Council.
0027a Statue of Innocent X a work of Algardi in the Great Hall or Hall of the Horatii and Curiatii. The Hall is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The fresco represents the Finding of the She-wolf with Romolus and Remus (1596): along the banks of the Tiber, under a fig tree, Faustulus discovers the she-wolf suckling Romulus and Remus. The representation of the she-wolf clearly alludes to the Capitoline Wolf, which is exhibited in the museum and is the symbol of the city.
Marble Statue portraying Urban VIII in the Great Hall or Hall of the Horatii and Curiatii. The Hall is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The statue is in marble and was carried out by Bernini and his pupils.
Detail of the fresco the Battle between Horatii and Curiatii in the Great Hall or Hall of the Horatii and Curiatii. The Hall is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The fresco decoration of this large room was carried out by Cavalier d'Arpino (Giuseppe Cesari) at the end XVI century and the beginning of the XVII century.
0027a Statue of Innocent X a work of Algardi in the Great Hall or Hall of the Horatii and Curiatii. The Hall is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The fresco represents the Finding of the She-wolf with Romolus and Remus (1596): along the banks of the Tiber, under a fig tree, Faustulus discovers the she-wolf suckling Romulus and Remus. The representation of the she-wolf clearly alludes to the Capitoline Wolf, which is exhibited in the museum and is the symbol of the city.
0040a Hall of the Captains located in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoes on the wall, by Tommaso Laureti, date back to the end of the XVI century. They refer to the early Republican Age and portray exemplary episodes of ancient Roman valour in the form of tapestries. The Room also contains stone tablets and portrait statues commemorating famous men and Captains of the Pontifical Militia.
The Spinario, Boy with Thorn, also known as Cavaspina is located in the hall of the Triumphs. The Hall is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The spinario which reproduces a young man removing a thorn from his foot is an eclectic work of the first century BC and one of a few large-scale bronze works to survive from antiquity. Well-known in Europe, it was very influential on artists in the Italian Renaissance. The work was donated by Sixtus IV in 1471.
The Capitoline Brutus in the hall of the Triumphs. The Hall is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. In 1564 Cardinal Pius da Carpi donated to the museum the magnificent bronze portrait from 4th, 3th century B.C. of extraordinary expressive force. The identification of the statue with Junius Brutus, the first Roman consul, represents an astute interpretation of the antiquarian culture. However, this assertion is without any real foundation.
Bronze sculpture called Camillo in the hall of the Triumphs, The Hall is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The bronze sculpture from the 1st century also known as the Gypsy, represents a young cult officiant. The work was donated by Sixtus IV in 1471.
The Hall of the She-wolf in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. Ever since the middle of the 16th century, when it was an open three-arched loggia, this room has contained the bronze Capitoline She-wolf, which has become the symbol of Rome. The dating of the work - traditionally dated to the first half of the V century BC, with many comparisons to Greek and Italic figurative production - was called into question by the results of Carbon 14 analysis performed on organic materials resulting from the casting process, which would bring the date to medieval times. The statue, donated to the Romans in 1471, became the symbol of Rome when, transferred to the Capitol, the twins Romulus and Remus (the legendary founders of the city) were added to the ancient bronze.
The Hall of the Geese in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The two bronze geese that give the room its name where placed here in the XVIII century, together with a bronze vase in the shape of a bust of Isis and a head of Medusa by Bernini.
The Head of Medusa by Bernini in the Hall of the Geese. The hall is in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Head of Medusa by the sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598 -1680) portrays the mythical figure of the Medusa, whose petrifying gaze and snake hair are rendered by the sculptor with grace and power.
The Hall of the Geese in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The two bronze geese that give the room its name where placed here in the XVIII century, together with a bronze vase in the shape of a bust of Isis and a head of Medusa by Bernini.
The Hall of the Geese in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The two bronze geese that give the room its name where placed here in the XVIII century, together with a bronze vase in the shape of a bust of Isis and a head of Medusa by Bernini.
view of The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
The Portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons in the Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The bust is one of the most famous masterpieces of Roman portraiture and depicts the emperor in the guise of Hercules, whose attributes he has been given: the lion's skin over his head, the club in this right hand, and the golden apples of Hesperides in his left hand as a reminder of the Greek hero's feats. The incredibily well-preserved bust is placed on a complex allegorical composition: two kneeling Amazons (only one is well-preserved) besige a globe decorated with the signs of the zodiac hold aloft a cornucopia, which is entwined with a pelta, the Amazons' characteristic shield. The celebratory intent that, through a wealth of symbols, imposes the divine cult of the emperor, is further underlined by the two marine Tritons flanking the central figure to express his apotheosis. The group was recovered in an underground room of the Horti Lamiani complex, where it had probably been hidden.
view of The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
view of The statue of the Esquiline Venus located in the Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The marble sculpture of the early imperial period was found in the Horti Lamiani on the Esquiline Hill in 1874.
The Marcus Aurelius Exedra in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The new grand glass hall built inside what was called the "Giardino Romano" in Palazzo dei Conservatori today contains the equestrian statue of Marc Aurelius together with some of the major Capitoline bronzes, the Hercules in gilded bronze from the Foro Boario the remains of the bronze colossus of Constantine. The large and bright hall houses the bronze equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, originally placed at the centre of Piazza del Campidoglio; a replica has now replaced it in the square to protect it from damage caused by outdoor exposure. Prominence was given to the monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus.
The Marcus Aurelius Exedra in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The new grand glass hall built inside what was called the "Giardino Romano" in Palazzo dei Conservatori today contains the equestrian statue of Marc Aurelius together with some of the major Capitoline bronzes, the Hercules in gilded bronze from the Foro Boario the remains of the bronze colossus of Constantine. The large and bright hall houses the bronze equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, originally placed at the centre of Piazza del Campidoglio; a replica has now replaced it in the square to protect it from damage caused by outdoor exposure. Prominence was given to the monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus.
Lion Attacking a Horse , in the Exedra of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. Hellenistic marble sculpture, 325–300 B.C.; restored in Rome in 1594
The Marcus Aurelius Exedra in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The new grand glass hall built inside what was called the "Giardino Romano" in Palazzo dei Conservatori today contains the equestrian statue of Marc Aurelius together with some of the major Capitoline bronzes, the Hercules in gilded bronze from the Foro Boario the remains of the bronze colossus of Constantine. The large and bright hall houses the bronze equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, originally placed at the centre of Piazza del Campidoglio; a replica has now replaced it in the square to protect it from damage caused by outdoor exposure. Prominence was given to the monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus.
The Equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius in the Exedra of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The large and bright hall houses the bronze equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, originally placed at the centre of Piazza del Campidoglio; a replica has now replaced it in the square to protect it from damage caused by outdoor exposure. The equestrian monument is not mentioned in ancient sources and was probably erected in 176 AD, to celebrate the emperor’s triumph over the Germanic tribes, or in 180 AD, shortly after his death. Kept at the Lateran since the Middle Ages, it was incorrectly thought to portray the first Christian Emperor, Constantine.
The Equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius in the Exedra of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The large and bright hall houses the bronze equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, originally placed at the centre of Piazza del Campidoglio; a replica has now replaced it in the square to protect it from damage caused by outdoor exposure. The equestrian monument is not mentioned in ancient sources and was probably erected in 176 AD, to celebrate the emperor’s triumph over the Germanic tribes, or in 180 AD, shortly after his death. Kept at the Lateran since the Middle Ages, it was incorrectly thought to portray the first Christian Emperor, Constantine.
The remains of the colossal bronze statue of Constantine in the Exedra of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. Formerly at the Lateran it was donated to the Capitoline Collection by Sixtus IV (1471)
The Marcus Aurelius Exedra in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The new grand glass hall built inside what was called the "Giardino Romano" in Palazzo dei Conservatori today contains the equestrian statue of Marc Aurelius together with some of the major Capitoline bronzes, the Hercules in gilded bronze from the Foro Boario the remains of the bronze colossus of Constantine. The large and bright hall houses the bronze equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, originally placed at the centre of Piazza del Campidoglio; a replica has now replaced it in the square to protect it from damage caused by outdoor exposure. Prominence was given to the monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus.
The Marcus Aurelius Exedra in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The new grand glass hall built inside what was called the "Giardino Romano" in Palazzo dei Conservatori today contains the equestrian statue of Marc Aurelius together with some of the major Capitoline bronzes, the Hercules in gilded bronze from the Foro Boario the remains of the bronze colossus of Constantine. The large and bright hall houses the bronze equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, originally placed at the centre of Piazza del Campidoglio; a replica has now replaced it in the square to protect it from damage caused by outdoor exposure. Prominence was given to the monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus.
The Halls of the Horti Tauriani – Vettiani of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. the home of Statilius Taurus, an eminent personality in the Rome of the I century AD, was known for his vastness and splendor. From this area come numerous sculptures that are attributable to the various phases of the history of the Horti: statues of divinities, reliefs with views or decorative motifs, two large marble craters and three splendid Imperial portraits.
The Halls of the Horti Tauriani – Vettiani of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. the home of Statilius Taurus, an eminent personality in the Rome of the I century AD, was known for his vastness and splendor. From this area come numerous sculptures that are attributable to the various phases of the history of the Horti: statues of divinities, reliefs with views or decorative motifs, two large marble craters and three splendid Imperial portraits.
The Halls of the Horti Tauriani – Vettiani of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. the home of Statilius Taurus, an eminent personality in the Rome of the I century AD, was known for his vastness and splendor. From this area come numerous sculptures that are attributable to the various phases of the history of the Horti: statues of divinities, reliefs with views or decorative motifs, two large marble craters and three splendid Imperial portraits.
The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
view of The Halls of the Horti of Maecenas in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti di Mecenate are the most ancient to be found at the residential gardens at the Esquilino; the friend and councillor of Emperor Augustus indeed transformed into a sumptuous residence an area that had until then been used as a necropolis, covering it with a large layer of earth. Later having passed to Imperial domain, the gardens became an extension of the Domus Aurea at the time of Nero. The sculpted decorations, found in pieces inside walls built in late antiquity, shows the cultural interests of the owner, with images of Muses and hermas with portraits of illustrious persons from literary circles, and his passion for collecting, with Greek funerary stones and very highquality copies of Greek originals.
The Fountain in the form of a horn-shaped drinking cup (rhyton) signed by Pontios is located in the Halls of the Horti of Maecenas of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti di Mecenate are the most ancient to be found at the residential gardens at the Esquilino.
The Statue of Marsyas is located in the Halls of the Horti of Maecenas of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The exceptional work in marble is a Roman copy from a Greek original of the 4th century BC. It was found in Rome, on the Esquiline: Hill near to the Auditorium of Maecenas in 1876. The Horti di Mecenate are the most ancient to be found at the residential gardens at the Esquilino.
view of The Halls of the Horti of Maecenas in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti di Mecenate are the most ancient to be found at the residential gardens at the Esquilino; the friend and councillor of Emperor Augustus indeed transformed into a sumptuous residence an area that had until then been used as a necropolis, covering it with a large layer of earth. Later having passed to Imperial domain, the gardens became an extension of the Domus Aurea at the time of Nero. The sculpted decorations, found in pieces inside walls built in late antiquity, shows the cultural interests of the owner, with images of Muses and hermas with portraits of illustrious persons from literary circles, and his passion for collecting, with Greek funerary stones and very highquality copies of Greek originals.
view of The Halls of the Horti of Maecenas in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti di Mecenate are the most ancient to be found at the residential gardens at the Esquilino; the friend and councillor of Emperor Augustus indeed transformed into a sumptuous residence an area that had until then been used as a necropolis, covering it with a large layer of earth. Later having passed to Imperial domain, the gardens became an extension of the Domus Aurea at the time of Nero. The sculpted decorations, found in pieces inside walls built in late antiquity, shows the cultural interests of the owner, with images of Muses and hermas with portraits of illustrious persons from literary circles, and his passion for collecting, with Greek funerary stones and very highquality copies of Greek originals.
The Halls of the Horti Tauriani – Vettiani of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. the home of Statilius Taurus, an eminent personality in the Rome of the I century AD, was known for his vastness and splendor. From this area come numerous sculptures that are attributable to the various phases of the history of the Horti: statues of divinities, reliefs with views or decorative motifs, two large marble craters and three splendid Imperial portraits.
The Halls of the Horti Tauriani – Vettiani of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. the home of Statilius Taurus, an eminent personality in the Rome of the I century AD, was known for his vastness and splendor. From this area come numerous sculptures that are attributable to the various phases of the history of the Horti: statues of divinities, reliefs with views or decorative motifs, two large marble craters and three splendid Imperial portraits.
view of The Statue of Hercules in gilded bronze in the Exedra of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The sculpture is located next to the monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus. The statue originated in the Forum Boarium, where it was found during the pontificate of Sixtus IV. The statue must have represented the cult statue whithin the round temple dedicated to the Greek hero in the second century BC. The statue's proportions and strong modeling demonstrate that it was based on Greek models of the fourth century BC, close to the Lysippic style. A recent hypothesis suggests that it could have derived directly from the mold of a bronze statue of that period.
view of The Statue of Hercules in gilded bronze in the Exedra of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The sculpture is located next to the monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus. The statue originated in the Forum Boarium, where it was found during the pontificate of Sixtus IV. The statue must have represented the cult statue whithin the round temple dedicated to the Greek hero in the second century BC. The statue's proportions and strong modeling demonstrate that it was based on Greek models of the fourth century BC, close to the Lysippic style. A recent hypothesis suggests that it could have derived directly from the mold of a bronze statue of that period.
The monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus. in the Exedra of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Temple of Capitoline Jupiter was dedicated to the Optimus Maximus Jupiter, together with the other two divinities that made up the Capitoline triad - Juno and Minerva. The building was begun by Tarquinius Priscus and completed by the last king of Rome, Tarquinius Superbus, although it was only inaugurated at the beginning of the Republican era in 509 BC.
The monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus. in the Exedra of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Temple of Capitoline Jupiter was dedicated to the Optimus Maximus Jupiter, together with the other two divinities that made up the Capitoline triad - Juno and Minerva. The building was begun by Tarquinius Priscus and completed by the last king of Rome, Tarquinius Superbus, although it was only inaugurated at the beginning of the Republican era in 509 BC.
view of The Statue of Hercules in gilded bronze in the Exedra of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The sculpture is located next to the monumental remains of the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus. The statue originated in the Forum Boarium, where it was found during the pontificate of Sixtus IV. The statue must have represented the cult statue whithin the round temple dedicated to the Greek hero in the second century BC. The statue's proportions and strong modeling demonstrate that it was based on Greek models of the fourth century BC, close to the Lysippic style. A recent hypothesis suggests that it could have derived directly from the mold of a bronze statue of that period.
view of The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
The Halls of the Horti Tauriani – Vettiani of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. the home of Statilius Taurus, an eminent personality in the Rome of the I century AD, was known for his vastness and splendor. From this area come numerous sculptures that are attributable to the various phases of the history of the Horti: statues of divinities, reliefs with views or decorative motifs, two large marble craters and three splendid Imperial portraits.
The Statue of a dog is located in the Halls of the Horti of Maecenas of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The marvelous statue in green marble was found in Rome, on the Esquiline: Hill near to the Auditorium of Maecenas in 1877. The Horti di Mecenate are the most ancient to be found at the residential gardens at the Esquilino; the friend and councillor of Emperor Augustus indeed transformed into a sumptuous residence an area that had until then been used as a necropolis, covering it with a large layer of earth.
The Halls of the Horti Tauriani – Vettiani of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. the home of Statilius Taurus, an eminent personality in the Rome of the I century AD, was known for his vastness and splendor. From this area come numerous sculptures that are attributable to the various phases of the history of the Horti: statues of divinities, reliefs with views or decorative motifs, two large marble craters and three splendid Imperial portraits.
The Halls of the Horti Tauriani – Vettiani of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. the home of Statilius Taurus, an eminent personality in the Rome of the I century AD, was known for his vastness and splendor. From this area come numerous sculptures that are attributable to the various phases of the history of the Horti: statues of divinities, reliefs with views or decorative motifs, two large marble craters and three splendid Imperial portraits.
The Head of an Amazon located in the Halls of the Horti of Maecenas in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The marvelous head of marble is a copy from an original of the 5th century BC. The Horti di Mecenate are the most ancient to be found at the residential gardens at the Esquilino; the friend and councillor of Emperor Augustus indeed transformed into a sumptuous residence an area that had until then been used as a necropolis, covering it with a large layer of earth. The sculpted decorations shows the cultural interests of the owner with very high quality copies of Greek originals.
The Head of an Amazon located in the Halls of the Horti of Maecenas in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The marvelous head of marble is a copy from an original of the 5th century BC. The Horti di Mecenate are the most ancient to be found at the residential gardens at the Esquilino; the friend and councillor of Emperor Augustus indeed transformed into a sumptuous residence an area that had until then been used as a necropolis, covering it with a large layer of earth. The sculpted decorations shows the cultural interests of the owner with very high quality copies of Greek originals.
The Herm of Menander is located in the Halls of the Horti of Maecenas of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The marble busto is a copy from a Greek original of the 3rd century BC, It was found on the Esquiline Hill near to the Auditorium of Maecenas (1874).
The Herm of Menander is located in the Halls of the Horti of Maecenas of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The marble busto is a copy from a Greek original of the 3rd century BC, It was found on the Esquiline Hill near to the Auditorium of Maecenas (1874).
The Halls of the Horti Tauriani – Vettiani of the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. the home of Statilius Taurus, an eminent personality in the Rome of the I century AD, was known for his vastness and splendor. From this area come numerous sculptures that are attributable to the various phases of the history of the Horti: statues of divinities, reliefs with views or decorative motifs, two large marble craters and three splendid Imperial portraits.
The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
Group of female statues found in the same room with the Esquiline Venus in the Horti Lamiani on the Esquiline Hill in 1874. They are located in the Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy.
Group of female statues found in the same room with the Esquiline Venus in the Horti Lamiani on the Esquiline Hill in 1874. They are located in the Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy.
Group of female statues found in the same room with the Esquiline Venus in the Horti Lamiani on the Esquiline Hill in 1874. They are located in the Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy.
The Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Horti Lamiani were founded by the consul Aelius Lamia, a friend of Tiberius, and very soon (already with Caligula) became part of Imperial property. A number of important statuary groups were also part of it, such as the Esquiline Venus with two priestesses or Muses beside her and the portrait of Commodus as Hercules flanked by tritons.
Group of female statues found in the same room with the Esquiline Venus in the Horti Lamiani on the Esquiline Hill in 1874. They are located in the Halls of the Horti Lamiani in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy.
Hall of the Tapestries in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. In the XVIII century a throne was installed to be used during papal visits and the room was decorated with tapestries from the Roman factory of San Michele and richly carved furniture. The cartoons of the tapestries by Domenico Corvi show historical and legendary episodes of ancient Rome, reproducing paintings by important artists, including Rubens and Poussin.
Hall of the Tapestries in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. In the XVIII century a throne was installed to be used during papal visits and the room was decorated with tapestries from the Roman factory of San Michele and richly carved furniture. The cartoons of the tapestries by Domenico Corvi show historical and legendary episodes of ancient Rome, reproducing paintings by important artists, including Rubens and Poussin.
Hall of the Tapestries in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. In the XVIII century a throne was installed to be used during papal visits and the room was decorated with tapestries from the Roman factory of San Michele and richly carved furniture. The cartoons of the tapestries by Domenico Corvi show historical and legendary episodes of ancient Rome, reproducing paintings by important artists, including Rubens and Poussin.
Hall of the Tapestries in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. In the XVIII century a throne was installed to be used during papal visits and the room was decorated with tapestries from the Roman factory of San Michele and richly carved furniture. The cartoons of the tapestries by Domenico Corvi show historical and legendary episodes of ancient Rome, reproducing paintings by important artists, including Rubens and Poussin.
Detail of the frescos representing Hannibal and the Punic War. The Hall of Hannibal is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoed decoration dating back to the first decade of the XVI century and traditionally attributed to Jacopo Ripanda celebrates episodes of the Punic Wars in four scenes; underneath runs a long frieze with niches containing busts of Roman generals.
The Chapel of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The chapel is dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, patron saints of Rome, who are portrayed in the ceiling frescoes that were executed at the same time as the stucco decorations by Michele Alberti and Jacopo Rocchetti in the third decade of the XVI century.
The Chapel of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The chapel is dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, patron saints of Rome, who are portrayed in the ceiling frescoes that were executed at the same time as the stucco decorations by Michele Alberti and Jacopo Rocchetti in the third decade of the XVI century.
Detail of the frescos representing Hannibal and the Punic War. The Hall of Hannibal is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoed decoration dating back to the first decade of the XVI century and traditionally attributed to Jacopo Ripanda celebrates episodes of the Punic Wars in four scenes; underneath runs a long frieze with niches containing busts of Roman generals.
Detail of the frescos representing Hannibal and the Punic War. The Hall of Hannibal is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoed decoration dating back to the first decade of the XVI century and traditionally attributed to Jacopo Ripanda celebrates episodes of the Punic Wars in four scenes; underneath runs a long frieze with niches containing busts of Roman generals.
The Chapel of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The chapel is dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, patron saints of Rome, who are portrayed in the ceiling frescoes that were executed at the same time as the stucco decorations by Michele Alberti and Jacopo Rocchetti in the third decade of the XVI century.
The Chapel of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The chapel is dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, patron saints of Rome, who are portrayed in the ceiling frescoes that were executed at the same time as the stucco decorations by Michele Alberti and Jacopo Rocchetti in the third decade of the XVI century.
Hall of the Captains located in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoes on the wall, by Tommaso Laureti, date back to the end of the XVI century. They refer to the early Republican Age and portray exemplary episodes of ancient Roman valour in the form of tapestries. The Room also contains stone tablets and portrait statues commemorating famous men and Captains of the Pontifical Militia.
0040a Hall of the Captains located in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoes on the wall, by Tommaso Laureti, date back to the end of the XVI century. They refer to the early Republican Age and portray exemplary episodes of ancient Roman valour in the form of tapestries. The Room also contains stone tablets and portrait statues commemorating famous men and Captains of the Pontifical Militia.
0040a Hall of the Captains located in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoes on the wall, by Tommaso Laureti, date back to the end of the XVI century. They refer to the early Republican Age and portray exemplary episodes of ancient Roman valour in the form of tapestries. The Room also contains stone tablets and portrait statues commemorating famous men and Captains of the Pontifical Militia.
0040a Hall of the Captains located in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoes on the wall, by Tommaso Laureti, date back to the end of the XVI century. They refer to the early Republican Age and portray exemplary episodes of ancient Roman valour in the form of tapestries. The Room also contains stone tablets and portrait statues commemorating famous men and Captains of the Pontifical Militia.
Detail of the fresco Victory at Lake Regillus in Hall of the Captains. The Hall is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoes on the wall, by Tommaso Laureti, date back to the end of the XVI century. They refer to the early Republican Age and portray exemplary episodes of ancient Roman valour in the form of tapestries.
Detail of the fresco Brutus’ Justice in Hall of the Captains. The Hall is part of the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The subject of the fresco is a little-known episode narrated by the historian Livy. The first consuls of the Republic, Brutus and Collatinus, see the assassination of Brutus’s sons, sentenced to death for high treason. For its symbolic meaning, the fresco was painted on the wall where the Court of the Conservators had been set up, with a Latin inscription “Diligite iustitiam” (Love Justice).
0040a Hall of the Captains located in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoes on the wall, by Tommaso Laureti, date back to the end of the XVI century. They refer to the early Republican Age and portray exemplary episodes of ancient Roman valour in the form of tapestries. The Room also contains stone tablets and portrait statues commemorating famous men and Captains of the Pontifical Militia.
0040a Hall of the Captains located in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The frescoes on the wall, by Tommaso Laureti, date back to the end of the XVI century. They refer to the early Republican Age and portray exemplary episodes of ancient Roman valour in the form of tapestries. The Room also contains stone tablets and portrait statues commemorating famous men and Captains of the Pontifical Militia.
The Hall of the Triumphs located in the Ceremonial Rooms of the Conservators, also known as the Apartment of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. This room contains some large bronze sculptures: the Capitoline Brutus, the Spinario and the Camillus.
The Hall of the Middle Ages in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Hall of the sixteenth century Capitoline Archive in the Palazzo dei Conservatori houses the new Hall of the Middle Ages of the Capitoline Museums, with a striking exhibition of the honorary monument of Charles I of Anjou. In the room there are also other works that help to illustrate the history of the Capitoline in the Middle Ages.
statue in The Hall of the Middle Ages in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy. The Hall of the sixteenth century Capitoline Archive in the Palazzo dei Conservatori houses the new Hall of the Middle Ages of the Capitoline Museums, with a striking exhibition of the honorary monument of Charles I of Anjou. In the room there are also other works that help to illustrate the history of the Capitoline in the Middle Ages.
Monumental staircase of Palazzo dei Conservatori in the Capitoline Museum, Rome, Italy.
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