The new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006. Wide glazed surfaces allow the viewer to admire the Ara Pacis with uniform lighting conditions
The new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006. Wide glazed surfaces allow the viewer to admire the Ara Pacis with uniform lighting conditions
Didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace
Julio-Claudian Family Tree in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace
Julio-Claudian Family Tree in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace
Julio-Claudian Family Tree in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace
Model of the Ara Pacis of Augustus in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It stood in the northeastern corner of the Campus Martius, the former flood plain of the Tiber River and gradually became buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
The Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier and opened to the public on April 21, 2006. The Ara Pacis of Augustus is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. Inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. with the end of the Roman Empire it became gradually buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
The Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier and opened to the public on April 21, 2006. The Ara Pacis of Augustus is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. Inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. with the end of the Roman Empire it became gradually buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
Julio-Claudian Family Tree in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace
View from the the west side of the enclosure of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier and opened to the public on April 21, 2006. The Ara Pacis of Augustus is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. Inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. with the end of the Roman Empire it became gradually buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
Model of the Ara Pacis of Augustus in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It stood in the northeastern corner of the Campus Martius, the former flood plain of the Tiber River and gradually became buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
Model of the Ara Pacis of Augustus in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It stood in the northeastern corner of the Campus Martius, the former flood plain of the Tiber River and gradually became buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
View from the the west side of the enclosure of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier and opened to the public on April 21, 2006. The Ara Pacis of Augustus is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. Inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. with the end of the Roman Empire it became gradually buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The altar stands on a podium of four steps, on top of which is the altar base, with another four steps at the front only. Above this rises the altar table, closed between a shelf on each side
Female statue from the forum of Cumae in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006. Wide glazed surfaces allow the viewer to admire the Ara Pacis with uniform lighting conditions
View from the east side of the enclosure of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier and opened to the public on April 21, 2006. The Ara Pacis of Augustus is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. Inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. with the end of the Roman Empire it became gradually buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
View from the east side of the enclosure of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier and opened to the public on April 21, 2006. The Ara Pacis of Augustus is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. Inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. with the end of the Roman Empire it became gradually buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
East side view of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. On the front of the enclosure to the left hand side according to a possible interpretation is represented Venus, Aeneas' divine mother and the founder of the Julian family. Two putti hover at the goddess' side; In her lap, a cluster of grapes and pomegranates finishes off the portrait of a fertility goddess, responsible for the flourishing of men, animals and plants
Detail of the south Side of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. A dense crowd of people is shown, moving from left to right; amongst them men, women and children, whose historical identity can only be constructed hypothetically. It is not entirely clear what the procession is doing: some think that the scene shows Augustus' return or the inauguration of the Ara Pacis itself
East side view of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. On the front of the enclosure to the left hand side according to a possible interpretation is represented Venus, Aeneas' divine mother and the founder of the Julian family. Two putti hover at the goddess' side; In her lap, a cluster of grapes and pomegranates finishes off the portrait of a fertility goddess, responsible for the flourishing of men, animals and plants
Detail of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis view from the east side in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy
North Side of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. A dense crowd of people is shown, moving from left to right; amongst them men, women and children, whose historical identity can only be constructed hypothetically. It is not entirely clear what the procession is doing: some think that the scene shows Augustus' return or the inauguration of the Ara Pacis itself
Entrance area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006. Wide glazed surfaces allow the viewer to admire the Ara Pacis with uniform lighting conditions
Detail of the north Side of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. A dense crowd of people is shown, moving from left to right; amongst them men, women and children, whose historical identity can only be constructed hypothetically. It is not entirely clear what the procession is doing: some think that the scene shows Augustus' return or the inauguration of the Ara Pacis itself
Archaeological remains in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006
Archaeological remains in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006
Archaeological remains in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006
Entrance area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006. Wide glazed surfaces allow the viewer to admire the Ara Pacis with uniform lighting conditions
Didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace
Didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace
The Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier and opened to the public on April 21, 2006. The Ara Pacis of Augustus is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. Inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. with the end of the Roman Empire it became gradually buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The altar stands on a podium of four steps, on top of which is the altar base, with another four steps at the front only. Above this rises the altar table, closed between a shelf on each side
East side view of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. On the front of the enclosure to the left hand side according to a possible interpretation is represented Venus, Aeneas' divine mother and the founder of the Julian family. Two putti hover at the goddess' side; In her lap, a cluster of grapes and pomegranates finishes off the portrait of a fertility goddess, responsible for the flourishing of men, animals and plants
East side view of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. On the front of the enclosure to the left hand side according to a possible interpretation is represented Venus, Aeneas' divine mother and the founder of the Julian family. Two putti hover at the goddess' side; In her lap, a cluster of grapes and pomegranates finishes off the portrait of a fertility goddess, responsible for the flourishing of men, animals and plants
Inside of the enclosure of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The altar stands on a podium of four steps, on top of which is the altar base, with another four steps at the front only. Above this rises the altar table
Inside of the enclosure of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The altar stands on a podium of four steps, on top of which is the altar base, with another four steps at the front only. Above this rises the altar table
Inside of the enclosure of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The altar stands on a podium of four steps, on top of which is the altar base, with another four steps at the front only. Above this rises the altar table
West side view of the Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis in the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy.On the front of the enclosure to the left hand side, a panel survives which depicts the myth of the foundation of Rome: Romulus and Remus are shown being suckled by the wolf
Model of the Ara Pacis of Augustus in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It stood in the northeastern corner of the Campus Martius, the former flood plain of the Tiber River and gradually became buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
Model of the Ara Pacis of Augustus in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It stood in the northeastern corner of the Campus Martius, the former flood plain of the Tiber River and gradually became buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
Model of the Ara Pacis of Augustus in the didactic area of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The Altar of Augustan Peace, commonly shortened to Ara Pacis is an altar dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It stood in the northeastern corner of the Campus Martius, the former flood plain of the Tiber River and gradually became buried under 4 meters (13 ft) of silt deposits. It was reassembled in its current location, now the Museum of the Ara Pacis, in 1938
The new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006. Wide glazed surfaces allow the viewer to admire the Ara Pacis with uniform lighting conditions
The new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006. Wide glazed surfaces allow the viewer to admire the Ara Pacis with uniform lighting conditions
The new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus, an ancient monument that was initially inaugurated on January 30, 9 B.C. It opened to the public on April 21, 2006. Wide glazed surfaces allow the viewer to admire the Ara Pacis with uniform lighting conditions
The Wall of the Res Gestae, outside view of the new museum complex for the Ara Pacis in Rome Italy. The complex was designed by the architect Richard Meier to house the Ara Pacis of Augustus. The Wall of the Res Gestae is the only element of the old pavilion from 1938 that has been preserved. Res Gestae Divi Augusti is the funerary inscription of the first Roman emperor, Augustus, giving a first-person record of his life and accomplishments
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